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“Folded to fit into a pocket…”

Delivering a Sermon without Pulpit and Cassock

Series:

Paulius V. Subačius

Abstract

In contemporary editions of sermons it is not easy to trace the authentic shape of these texts. Diplomatic publishing of sermon manuscripts reveals the priests’ “homework” rather than their activity in the pulpit. These editions reduce sermons to spiritual and theological writings that were read privately, thus removing their social uniqueness. This article addresses this problems with reference to a collection of manuscript notes of sermons and religion lectures by the well-known Lithuanian poet and preacher Silvestras Gimžauskas from the second half of the nineteenth century and suggests alterantives to preserve or mimic the sermons’ inherent orality.

Series:

Paulius V. Subačius

Abstract

The earliest Lithuanian and Latvian editorial efforts intended to show that behind the scarcity of mature literary works there existed an older medieval, orally transmitted cultural tradition. Its rediscovery was mostly assigned to folklore publications which were remarkable for their philological quality. The professional collection of folklore was likewise more advanced than that of ancient manuscripts. The character of the first annotated folklore editions was determined by the fact that they were addressed not only to local readers, but also to foreign linguists, whose interest in the Baltic languages required an exact rendering of textual features. The modern national literature drew its pedigree from folk culture and folklore publications, sidelining the heritage of written (religious and didactic) literary sources.

Series:

Edited by Hans Walter Gabler, Peter Robinson and Paulius V. Subačius

Series:

Edited by Hans Walter Gabler, Peter Robinson and Paulius V. Subačius

Textual scholarship has always been closely linked to questions of canonicity, both in terms of what texts are edited and how they are edited. As attitudes towards the canon have altered over the last decade, textual scholarship too has changed, both in practice and theory. The essays in this collection examine the connections between textual scholarship and the canon, and the implications for textual scholarship of changing attitudes to the canon within the wider academic environment. As is now characteristic of Variants, essays range widely over time and space in their focus, reflecting the breadth of the Society’s membership and interests. Two essays focus on different aspects of the distinctive Lithuanian experience of the canon. Other essays trace the influence of the concept in Sweden, the problematic nature of the canon when dealing with unstable medieval texts, the debate within the German scholarly community about modes of editing, developments in the canon outside the academic world in the last decades, and an account of the problems of editing a very non-canonical text. Three essays not linked to the theme of the volume close the collection: an account of the galley proofs of Pynchon’s V., a survey of developments in book design for scholarly editions through print and beyond, and an account of the reception of Ossian, which fuses book history, textual scholarship and intellectual history.

Series:

Edited by Hans Walter Gabler, Peter Robinson and Paulius V. Subačius