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The following discussion continues the exploration of the role of the written word and the media in the context of selected aspects and case studies from within Asia-EU relations. This contribution proposes a look ‘behind the scenes’, as it were, of the language used to delineate, critique and develop EU-Asia relations. The author looks, in particular, at the ways in which the political, economic and cultural facets of EU-Asia interaction are represented, ‘framed’ and ‘constructed’ in selected key international newspapers, namely the Financial Times and the Economist. The piece also de-constructs the language used in a representative sample of official EU documentation, in order to characterise, and give shape to, EU-Asia relations. The author offers an analytical perspective informed by social-constructivist approaches and discourse analysis. He focuses on the ways in which ‘values’ and ‘identities’ are used in the ‘ideational’ construction of the contemporary EU-Asia political space.

In: The European Union and Asia
Author:

Abstract

The following discussion continues the exploration of the role of the written word and the media in the context of selected aspects and case studies from within Asia-EU relations. This contribution proposes a look ‘behind the scenes’, as it were, of the language used to delineate, critique and develop EU-Asia relations. The author looks, in particular, at the ways in which the political, economic and cultural facets of EU-Asia interaction are represented, ‘framed’ and ‘constructed’ in selected key international newspapers, namely the Financial Times and the Economist. The piece also de-constructs the language used in a representative sample of official EU documentation, in order to characterise, and give shape to, EU-Asia relations. The author offers an analytical perspective informed by social-constructivist approaches and discourse analysis. He focuses on the ways in which ‘values’ and ‘identities’ are used in the ‘ideational’ construction of the contemporary EU-Asia political space.

In: The European Union and Asia
Volume Editors: and
This volume represents the first, in-depth, inter-disciplinary, analysis of the past, present and future of the European Union’s relations with countries, non-state actors and other partners across the Asia-Pacific region. The book is situated in the developing, interdisciplinary, discourse of EU foreign policy towards countries and regions across Asia, and it offers a research-led critique of the construction and the elements of the EU-Asia ‘political space’. Written by an international team of experts from both Asia and Europe, the volume investigates the historical and cultural background, as well as diverse representations and imaginations in regard to the Asia-Europe inter-continental dialogue. The book examines the varied patterns, policies and priorities of the contemporary political, economic and cultural relations linking the EU with its interlocutors in Asia. Moreover, this collection throws light on a selected number of issues pertinent to current EU-Asia interaction, such as human rights promotion, learning and educational exchange, and the role of the mass media in the construction of Asia-Europe relations. The twelve chapters in this book cover a wide scope of subjects, including the EU’s Relations with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the summitry of the Asia-Europe Meetings (ASEM), EU foreign policy choices in Asia and EU contacts with Central Asia, Australia and New Zealand. This text is of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students, lecturers, the business community, decision-makers and practitioners in Politics, European Studies, Asia-Pacific Studies, International Relations, Law, Human Rights and Business Studies.

Abstract

After an initial investigation of the motives underlying the Euroscepticism of three tabloid newspapers (the Sun, the Mail and the recently schizophrenic Express), this article focuses in detail on the sceptic broadsheets, the Times and the Daily Telegraph. It examines the discourses of nationalism present in these papers’ reporting on the European Union, prior to suggesting that in most cases this nationalism appears, to varying degrees, to be a facade masking the commercial interests of the papers’ proprietors. The article concludes by looking at the implications for British democracy of the manner in which the UK Eurosceptic press reports on the EU.

In: Euroscepticism

Abstract

After an initial investigation of the motives underlying the Euroscepticism of three tabloid newspapers (the Sun, the Mail and the recently schizophrenic Express), this article focuses in detail on the sceptic broadsheets, the Times and the Daily Telegraph. It examines the discourses of nationalism present in these papers’ reporting on the European Union, prior to suggesting that in most cases this nationalism appears, to varying degrees, to be a facade masking the commercial interests of the papers’ proprietors. The article concludes by looking at the implications for British democracy of the manner in which the UK Eurosceptic press reports on the EU.

In: Euroscepticism

Abstract

One of the most frequently made European criticisms of China under communist rule has been of the continuing restrictions that the government places upon the freedom of expression of citizens and journalists. This study analyses Chinese journalism within an evolving political system, penetrated increasingly by Western ideas and criticisms as a result of globalisation, the opening up of the Chinese economy and the education of significant numbers of Chinese students in the West. It examines formal and informal restrictions on journalists’ freedom of expression in China. It discusses the modest expansion in their freedom of manoeuvre, as the media has been opened to market forces, and limited forms of criticism have been permitted. The study further explores Chinese views on media control in the context of both historically-rooted concerns about social stability and Communist Party ideology. The analysis concludes by discussing possible paths forward for Chinese journalism, bearing in mind the fact that the internet is likely to become increasingly difficult for the authorities to control, with both user numbers, and technological advances, increasing significantly.

In: The European Union and China

Abstract

One of the most frequently made European criticisms of China under communist rule has been of the continuing restrictions that the government places upon the freedom of expression of citizens and journalists. This study analyses Chinese journalism within an evolving political system, penetrated increasingly by Western ideas and criticisms as a result of globalisation, the opening up of the Chinese economy and the education of significant numbers of Chinese students in the West. It examines formal and informal restrictions on journalists’ freedom of expression in China. It discusses the modest expansion in their freedom of manoeuvre, as the media has been opened to market forces, and limited forms of criticism have been permitted. The study further explores Chinese views on media control in the context of both historically-rooted concerns about social stability and Communist Party ideology. The analysis concludes by discussing possible paths forward for Chinese journalism, bearing in mind the fact that the internet is likely to become increasingly difficult for the authorities to control, with both user numbers, and technological advances, increasing significantly.

In: The European Union and China
In: The European Union and Asia
In: The European Union and Asia

Abstract

This paper presents the key international legal instrument relevant for education, their use and links with policy frameworks and tools being developed by the humanitarian community to address education rights of children in conflict and emergencies. It describes the current thinking around the right to education in emergencies and why education is a central right to uphold from the onset of a crisis. It gives a brief introduction to how education can meet the international legal standards, as well as the international policy frameworks, such the Millennium Development Goals and Education for All. A continuous case study focuses on Cote d'Ivoire and how the right to education fared in the conflict of that country between 2000 and 2010. The paper looks at issues of enforceability and applicability of the right to education in emergencies, highlighting challenges and mechanisms at national, regional and international levels. The role of the InterAgency Network for Education in Emergencies' (INEE) Minimum Standards for Education as well as the Inter-Agency Standing Committee's (IASC) Education Cluster is discussed, again with specific reference to Cote d'Ivoire, and the centrality of existing monitoring and reporting mechanisms for child rights violations are highlighted. Bringing together all of these elements in one place and making a strong case for the use of both humanitarian and human rights law in securing the right to education in emergencies is what this article brings to the discussion, arguing that the Convention of the Rights of the Child must be seen as the most central instrument.

In: Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies