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Social efficacy as canonical myths is present as curricula designed to translate global and local knowledge and manifests itself in the sub-urban experiences of daily teacher work. As teachers we need opportunities to connect the personal with a curriculum dominated identity; a human kind of experience, with research as a living guide to meaning. Education continues the research on teacher identity in systems. The relative habitat of self in the context of teaching however, is a topic still under review, especially as it applies to the storying of self in a collective professional life-world and the artefacts and icons of system logic. I use autobiography combined with narrative inquiry as literary media to explore the teacher as a vocational being with a human map connected to others. Storying serves as an empathetic bridge to development and invites reflexive practice, as we recollect our lives and reflect on experience. I use the ‘technique’ of poly-vocal writing as evocative exploration to discuss identity among the overt and covert nature of teaching and infuse autobiography with interpretation, calling on salient literature as referent voices. Conscious constructed tales enabled me to explore the archetypal, reflexive and metaphorical acts of human meaning in the context of practice. In my thesis I act as an imaginative interpreter, drawing on experiences as teacher, writer, artist and creative facilitator providing a unilateral voice in the practice of knowing the self as a referent to knowing the other. And, as stories often go, I became an insider-observer or locus inquirer, to facilitate teachers as ethnographers of the self, as the reading and writing agents for transformation.

In: Why do We Write as We Write? Paradigms, Power, Poetics, Praxis
In: Key Works in Critical Pedagogy

The proposed chapter begins with illustrating how we have termed the Nepali society, and the education system adopted by it, as transitional on the basis of an unstable political system, cultural fluidity, changing economic policies and practices and the growing import of new technologies. With more focus on narrative genre of representation, we shall explore and critique the existing classroom micropolitics in accordance with the notion that Nepal should embrace a critical mathematics education perspective that upholds cultural pluralism and a strong democratic ethos by adopting ethics of communication that promote: (a) respect for the individual learner as a meaning maker and stakeholder in the future of both local and global societies and (b) good social dynamics for negotiating the construction of meaning and promoting critical literacy. Drawing on socio-cultural and public educational perspectives, we shall explore some practical ways to promote the cultural contextualisation of mathematics that can contribute to the development of a sustainable mathematics education program for the primary and secondary schools in Nepal.

In: Education Reform in Societies in Transition
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures
In: Research as Transformative Learning for Sustainable Futures