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Author: Peter Davis

Abstract

A variety of techniques have been used in collecting fishes for scientific purposes; most of these proved relatively successful, and despite the difficulties of travel and disease faced by early collectors, fishes formed a main component of many early collections. They were incorporated into well-known institutions throughout Europe and North America, and remain a major resource for today’s taxonomists. However, it was the limited preservation and labelling techniques available to early collectors that had such a major impact on the survival of the collections made in the field by naturalists. The problems faced by several well-known fish collectors, including Peter Forsskål, Joseph Banks, George Vachell, Francis Day and George Johnston – and the fate of the collections they made – are described.


In: Naturalists in the Field
Author: Peter Davis

Abstract

A variety of techniques have been used in collecting fishes for scientific purposes; most of these proved relatively successful, and despite the difficulties of travel and disease faced by early collectors, fishes formed a main component of many early collections. They were incorporated into well-known institutions throughout Europe and North America, and remain a major resource for today’s taxonomists. However, it was the limited preservation and labelling techniques available to early collectors that had such a major impact on the survival of the collections made in the field by naturalists. The problems faced by several well-known fish collectors, including Peter Forsskål, Joseph Banks, George Vachell, Francis Day and George Johnston – and the fate of the collections they made – are described.


In: Naturalists in the Field
In: Brill's Companion to Valerius Flaccus
In: Brill's Companion to the Reception of Senecan Tragedy
In: Brill's Companion to Statius
In: Brill's Companion to the Reception of Senecan Tragedy
Volume Editors: Peter H. Marsden and Geoffrey V. Davis
Studying postcolonial literatures in English can (and indeed should) make a human rights activist of the reader – there is, after all, any amount of evidence to show the injustices and inhumanity thrown up by processes of decolonization and the struggle with past legacies and present corruptions. Yet the human-rights aspect of postcolonial literary studies has been somewhat marginalized by scholars preoccupied with more fashionable questions of theory.
The present collection seeks to redress this neglect, whereby the definition of human rights adopted is intentionally broad. The volume reflects the human rights situation in many countries from Mauritius to New Zealand, from the Cameroon to Canada. It includes a focus on the Malawian writer Jack Mapanje.
The contributors’ concerns embrace topics as varied as denotified tribes in India, female genital mutilation in Africa, native residential schools in Canada, political violence in Northern Ireland, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and the discourse of the Treaty of Waitangi. The editors hope that the very variety of responses to the invitation to reflect on questions of “Literature and Human Rights” will both stimulate further discussion and prompt action.
Contributors are: Edward O. Ako, Hilarious N. Ambe, Ken Arvidson, Jogamaya Bayer, Maggie Ann Bowers, Chandra Chatterjee, Lindsey Collen, G.N. Devy, James Gibbs, J.U. Jacobs, Karen King–Aribisala, Sindiwe Magona, Lee Maracle, Stuart Marlow, Don Mattera, Wumi Raji. Lesego Rampolokeng, Dieter Riemenschneider, Ahmed Saleh, Jamie S. Scott, Mark Shackleton, Johannes A. Smit, Peter O. Stummer, Robert Sullivan, Rajiva Wijesinha, Chantal Zabus