Editor: Peter Ester
A Cross-National and Intergenerational Perspective
Values are a hot topic in Europe, both in the public and political debate as well as in the social sciences. Is Europe a community of values? What are the cultural borders of the European Union? How united are Europeans with respect to their fundamental values? How does globalization affect European values? Do national values vanish?
There is also a clear moral overtone in the debate: basic values are believed to erode, community values are waning, values become fragmented, and civic engagement is rapidly declining while hedonism and consumerism are prevailing. But are these far-reaching assumptions true? Answers are provided in this book.
The three core issues that guide the various chapters in this book are the following: do basic values in European countries converge or diverge? Do we observe a marked decline in traditional values in European societies? Is it the youngest generation in Europe that embraces new values?
Value Change in Europe and North America
The European Values Study is a large-scale, cross-national, and longitudinal survey research program on basic human values, initiated by the European Value Systems Study Group (EVSSG) in the late 1970s, at that time an informal grouping of academics. Now, it is carried on in the setting of a foundation, using the (abbreviated) name of the group European Values Study (EVS).
The EVSSG aimed at designing and conducting a major empirical study of the moral and social values underlying European social and political institutions and governing conduct.

A rich academic literature has now been created around the original survey, and numerous other works have made use of the findings.
Dimensions of Culture in a Comparative Perspective
Culture explains much of the behavioral and institutional differences around the globe. In social science there are many ways of framing cultural diversities. This book brings together authors with a classic status in the field of comparative cultural studies on one overarching theme: what are the relevant differences and similarities of contemporary cultural dimensions with which countries, organizations, and people can be compared? This book is the first publication available in which the cultural divisions of the world are compared and confronted. In the first part of the book classic authors reflect on each others key work and assess the main overlap and distinction. The book next provides insight in frontline academic work from a wide range of countries and social science disciplines dealing with the classic status cultural dimensions aimed at addressing contemporary key issues.
A Comparative Empirical Study of Russian and Western Political Cultures
The cross-national analyses of Western and Russian political cultures presented in this book are partly based on the 1990 EVS data. Another data source comes from surveys that were conducted since the late 1980s by the Department of Social Dynamics of the Institute of Socio-Political Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISPR RAS) This Volume pictures a wide variety of values in the social and political domain and reveals unique insights in Russian culture. It makes clear that, despite many differences, Russian and Westerners have also many things in common as far as basic values are concerned.

This is the fourth volume in the series. The first book is The Individualizing Socitey (1993, 1994) edited by Peter Ester, Loek Halman and Ruud de Moor. The second book is Values in Western Societies (1995) edited by Ruud de Moor. A third book is titled Political Value Change in Western Democracies (1996) and is edited by Loek Halman and Neil Nevitte.