Author: PETER J. GENTRY

This study elucidates corruption and influence from the versions of the Three Jewish Revisors (Aquila, Symmachus, and Theodotion) on the textual transmission of the Greek Ecclesiastes and its congeners, especially the Old Latin, as well as corruption of the textual transmission of the Three from the LXX. In some cases, the incestuous relationship between the LXX and the Three cannot be sorted out. The Syro-Hexapla, the Syriac translation of the hexaplaric text, is one of the most important and reliable witnesses to the hexaplaric group and to the Three. The analysis clarifies considerably the text history of the LXX Ecclesiastes.

In: Aramaic Studies
Author: Peter Gentry

Abstract

Some marginal notes in the Syro-Hexapla of Ecclesiastes,as represented by the Codex Ambrosianus, indicate that Aquila, Symmachus, and Theodotion are identical to the text of the Seventy in Origen's Fifth Column. Careful scrutiny reveals that these notes derive from a different manuscript than the one from which the lemma text of the Syro-Hexapla was translated. The evidence also suggests that the term oμoíως is used when identity with the lemma but not the o′ text is in view, and oμoíως τoις o′ when identity not only with the lemma but also the o′ text obtains. This results in a proposed text for α′ σ′ ϑ′ which differs from that given in Field's Origenis Hexaplorum quae supersunt.

In: Aramaic Studies
Author: Peter Gentry

Abstract

Careful investigation of the marginal notes in the Syro-Hexapla of Ecclesiastes indicates that the notes originated from a manuscript which did not have a Hexaplaric text. The excerptor was concerned about agreements between the Old Greek Text of Ecclesiastes and the Three and from this perspective, careful scrutiny of the notes indicates the relation between the Old Greek of Ecclesiastes and Theodotion is closer than that between the Old Greek and Aquila.

In: Aramaic Studies
Author: Peter Gentry

Abstract

This investigation of the marginal notes in the Syro-Hexapla of Ecclesiastes delineates the role of the text history of the O(ld) G(reek) in determining the text of the Three (Aquila, Symmachus, and Theodotion), the relation of the Three and the Old Latin in the text history of the OG, and the role of the Three in determining the text of the OG. The implications for a new critical edition of the Three are elaborated as well as for the lexicography of the Three.

In: Aramaic Studies
In: Textus