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Edited by Peter O'Connor

Western Journalists on Japan, China and Greater East Asia, 1897-1956, planned as a collection in four series of 10-volume sets, offers a significant primary source of journalistic memoir and journalism relating to East Asia, Japan's brief empire in South-East Asia, civil war and communist unification in China and the Cold War in East Asia over a period of six decades. With a Foreword by Waseda University’s Tsuchiya Reiko and a General Introduction by Series Editor Peter O’Connor, each Series contextualises dispatches to Western newspapers and highlights on-the-spot reports and memoirs from Anglophone Western and Asian journalists based in East and South-East Asia and writing for locally-published English-language newspapers. Series 2: Pioneering Women Journalists, 1919-1949 comprises 16 full-length volumes (c.4100 pages), opening with Ellen La Motte’s Peking Dust (1919) and concluding with Anna Louise Strong’s The Chinese Conquer China (1949).
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Japanese Propaganda: Selected Readings

Series 1: Books, 1872-1943

Edited by Peter O'Connor

The books in this collection highlight the main planks of Japan’s propaganda platform – merits and flaws – in her case in the Meiji period. She needed to make her case to the West and did so in English through Western and East Asian English-language newspapers and books.

Co-published with Edition Synapse, Tokyo. NO SALES RIGHTS IN JAPAN
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Edited by Peter O'Connor

This collection puts the spotlight on the world’s reactions to Japan’s Imperial agenda. It contains out of print and otherwise difficult to obtain publications – novels, pamphlets, articles – that respond both for and against Japan’s propaganda.

Co-published with Edition Synapse, Tokyo. NO SALES RIGHTS IN JAPAN
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Edited by Peter O'Connor

With the publication of Critical Readings, Series 2, we are pleased to offer the 20-volume Japanese Propaganda: Selected Readings Series plus the 20-volume Critical Readings on Japan, 1906-1948 Series as a unified collection: The Representation of Japan in Modern East Asia, 1872-1948.

Taken together, these sets offer an unrivalled perspective on East Asia’s propaganda wars in the modern era. The two Japanese Propaganda Series present the case made by Japanese publicists in English for Japan’s evolving agenda in East Asia and beyond. Series 1 presents ten volumes of books, with a General Introduction by Series Editor Peter O’Connor and introductions to each volume contributed by an international panel of scholars. Series 2 offers another General Introduction and presents eighty-nine scarce pamphlets, many never before reprinted, in ten thematically organized volumes.

The two series of Critical Readings on Japan, 1906-1948 demonstrate the world’s reactions to Japan’s agenda and counter-arguments to Japan’s master narrative, as well as more immediate responses to Japanese incursions in East and South-East Asia. Series 1 offers a selection of key critical books, each with a scholarly introduction. Over ten volumes, Series 2 presents sixty-two extremely rare pamphlets and articles from the press and media of the day. Both Series begin with a General Introduction by Series Editor Peter O’Connor.

Co-published with Edition Synapse, Tokyo. NO SALES RIGHTS IN JAPAN
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Edited by Peter O'Connor

The second series of Critical Readings offers in ten volumes a selection of sixty-six English-language pamphlets, press and journal articles, many extremely rare. This selection of valuable primary media history resources – published between 1906 and 1948 – takes Japan’s agenda from the aftermath of victory against Russia and a free hand in Manchuria through Japan’s blitzkrieg on Asia to the ignominy and ruin of 1945, and beyond to the ousting of the Guomindang and the approaching unification of China under Mao.

Volumes 9 and 10 demonstrate that even among the most vociferous critics of Japan’s agenda in East Asia, the greater perceived enemy in the 1920s was the Communist Party of China. They show that opposition to the Communists did not mean signing up to Japan’s agenda, despite Japan’s self-appointed mission to rid Asia of the Communist menace, as exemplified in the selection for the companion collection, also edited by Peter O’Connor, Japanese Propaganda: Selected Readings, Series 1 and 2.

Co-published with Edition Synapse, Tokyo. NO SALES RIGHTS IN JAPAN
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Japanese Propaganda: Selected Readings

Series 2: Pamphlets, 1891-1939

Edited by Peter O'Connor

The books in this collection highlight the main planks of Japan’s propaganda platform – merits and flaws – in her case in the Meiji period. She needed to make her case to the West and did so in a series of pamphlets written by Japanese and sympathetic Westerners.

Co-published with Edition Synapse, Tokyo. NO SALES RIGHTS IN JAPAN
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Edited by Peter O'Connor

Western Journalists on Japan, China and Greater East Asia, 1897-1956, which is to be published in four series of ten volumes each, offers a significant collection of journalistic memoir and journalism relating to East Asia, Japan's brief empire in South-East Asia, civil war and communist unification in China and the Cold War in East Asia. With a Foreword by Waseda University’s Tsuchiya Reiko and a General Introduction by Series Editor Peter O’Connor, each series contextualises dispatches to Western newspapers and highlights on-the-spot reports and memoirs from Anglophone Western and Asian journalists based in East and South-East Asia and writing for locally-published English-language newspapers. Series 1: Japan 1897-1942 opens with a forthright article by Robert Young of the Japan Chronicle and closes with the premature triumphalism of The Setting Sun of Japan (1942), by Carl Landau and Leane Zugsmith. The collection comprises a total of sixteen texts, of which thirteen are full-length works, totalling in all 4100 pages.
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Peter O'Connor

This study is the first to assess the combined significance of the English-language newspapers of China, Japan and Korea in the period 1918-45. It not only frames the English-language press networks in the international media history of East Asia but also relates them to media developments in the ‘British world’ linking Fleet Street to the Empire and Dominions, and to the rise of the United States as a broker of international opinion on and in the Asia-Pacific. The English-language newspapers occupied a narrow but significant segment of the public sphere in East Asia in the inter-war years.As forums of opinion on Japanese, Chinese and Western interests in East Asia, they also served as vehicles of propaganda, particularly during the crisis-ridden 1930s and the Pacific War. With this examination of the media affiliations, editorial line, and access to official bodies in East Asia and theWest of most of the English-language newspapers published in East Asia in the period under review, the author demonstrates that these publications formed distinct networks in terms of the editorial positions they took vis-a-vis the key issues of the day, especially Japan’s imperial project in East Asia.