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In: Ford Madox Ford, Modernist Magazines and Editing
In: The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship
In: Aphoristic Modernity
In: Protecting Humanity
In: Textual Scholarship and the Canon

Abstract

Infections of amphibian eggs sometimes cause catastrophic losses of reproductive effort, but susceptibility to infection in different species is poorly understood. Using laboratory trials we showed that direct hyphal invasion of adjacent eggs by Saprolegnia caused a higher incidence of infection than invasion by zoospores. Moreover, we observed that dead eggs were much more readily colonized than live eggs when challenged with zoospores from two strains of Saprolegnia. The two strains were equally effective in causing infections of Rana temporaria eggs, but differed in their ability to infect eggs of Bufo bufo. In live R. temporaria eggs, early stages (pre-tailbud) were more frequently infected by hyphal invasion than later stages by the same strains, suggesting that susceptibility to infection decreases as development proceeds.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia
Textual scholarship has always been closely linked to questions of canonicity, both in terms of what texts are edited and how they are edited. As attitudes towards the canon have altered over the last decade, textual scholarship too has changed, both in practice and theory. The essays in this collection examine the connections between textual scholarship and the canon, and the implications for textual scholarship of changing attitudes to the canon within the wider academic environment. As is now characteristic of Variants, essays range widely over time and space in their focus, reflecting the breadth of the Society’s membership and interests. Two essays focus on different aspects of the distinctive Lithuanian experience of the canon. Other essays trace the influence of the concept in Sweden, the problematic nature of the canon when dealing with unstable medieval texts, the debate within the German scholarly community about modes of editing, developments in the canon outside the academic world in the last decades, and an account of the problems of editing a very non-canonical text. Three essays not linked to the theme of the volume close the collection: an account of the galley proofs of Pynchon’s V., a survey of developments in book design for scholarly editions through print and beyond, and an account of the reception of Ossian, which fuses book history, textual scholarship and intellectual history.
In: Textual Scholarship and the Canon
In: Textual Scholarship and the Canon