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Peter Sarris

Abstract

This essay examines the role of state regulation, markets, and social structures in shaping the development of the Roman economy in Late Antiquity. It argues that the recent tendency amongst ancient historians to emphasise the role of markets, represents a welcome corrective to earlier primitivist tendencies. However, it is important that the current focus on markets should not distract attention from the strongly interventionist instincts of the Roman state, its role in fostering and stimulating commodified exchange, and the extent to which markets were managed to serve the interests of the government and the Roman governing classes.

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Peter Sarris

Abstract

This essay examines the role of state regulation, markets, and social structures in shaping the development of the Roman economy in Late Antiquity. It argues that the recent tendency amongst ancient historians to emphasise the role of markets, represents a welcome corrective to earlier primitivist tendencies. However, it is important that the current focus on markets should not distract attention from the strongly interventionist instincts of the Roman state, its role in fostering and stimulating commodified exchange, and the extent to which markets were managed to serve the interests of the government and the Roman governing classes.

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Peter Sarris

This article argues that recent emphasis on late antique economic expansion in the eastern Mediterranean and the prosperity of the peasantry of the East Roman empire has led historians to underestimate the economic importance of great estates owned by members of the imperial service aristocracy. This tendency has been exacerbated by the misleading testimony of early Byzantine saints’ lives, and an assumption that great estates were inherently autarchic and economically regressive. Rather, the evidence of the papyri and imperial legislation on the colonate would suggest that such great estates were highly commodified and monetised enterprises that contributed to economic growth.

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Peter Sarris, Matthew Dal Santo and Phil Booth

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Peter Sarris, Matthew Dal Santo and Phil Booth

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Peter Sarris, Matthew Dal Santo and Phil Booth

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An Age of Saints?

Power, Conflict and Dissent in Early Medieval Christianity

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Edited by Peter Sarris, Matthew Dal Santo and Phil Booth

The papers collected in this volume explore the strategies through which Christian authorities throughout the early medieval world both established and expressed their social position, while at the same time drawing attention to the moments when those same processes were resisted and challenged. Where previous studies of Christianisation have for the most part approached the issue of dissent through the continued existence of paganism and the various Christian heresies, this volume suggests that the experience of doubt towards, and articulation of resistance to, the claims of Christian leaders extended far outside the circles of pagan intellectuals and dissident theologians. The result is a view of Christianisation as far more piecemeal, complex and incomplete than has often been acknowledged.
Contributors include Peter Turner, Peter Kritzinger, Collin Garbarino, Philip Wood, Ralph Lee, Richard Payne, Mike Humphreys, Giorgia Vocino, and Gerda Heydemann.