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Edited by Johannes L. Brandl and Peter Sullivan

Ever since the publication of 'Truth' in 1959 Sir Michael Dummett has been acknowledged as one of the most profoundly creative and influential of contemporary philosophers. His contributions to the philosophy of thought and language, logic, the philosophy of mathematics, and metaphysics have set the terms of some of most fruitful discussions in philosophy. His work on Frege stands unparalleled, both as landmark in the history of philosophy and as a deep reflection on the defining commitments of the analytic school.
This volume of specially composed essays on Dummett's philosophy presents a new perspective on his achievements, and provides a focus for further research fully informed by the Dummett's most recent publications. Collectively the essays in philosophy of mathematics provide the most sustained discussion to date of the role of Dummett's diagnosis of the root of the logico-mathematical paradoxes in his case for an intuitionist revision of classical mathematics. The themes of other essays include a fundamental challenge to Dummett's Fregean understanding of predication, and a criticism of his case for logical revision outside of mathematics.

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Kirk Patrick Haig Sullivan and Peter E. Czigler

Abstract

Supporting the development of professional skills is a central role of professional degree programmes. This case study considers how one audiology degree programme implemented reflective writing to support student professional development during periods of practical training. In particular, the case considers how much and what type of reflection can be seen in the students’ reflective writing, and whether improvement in reflection based on formative feedback is a valid base for differential grading. An analysis of 72 pages of student reflective writing written during the final long period of practical training in the clinic showed that both the way reflective processes were taught and how it was to be assessed framed and limited the quality of the reflection. For example, the taught model of reflection was strictly followed and, in all cases, the catalyst chosen was the extraordinary event. On the basis of our analysis we propose that reflective writing to support professional development should not form part of a student’s assessment. Supporting the development of reflective skills without the stress of being assessed, we believe, will give the students space to reflect upon the everyday and feel less restrained by the taught model of reflection.

Barbara Clarke, Tasos Barkatsas, Helen Forgasz, Wee Tiong Seah and Peter Sullivan

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Edited by Helen Forgasz, Anastasios Barkatsas, Alan Bishop, Barbara Clarke, Stephen Keast, Wee Tiong Seah and Peter Sullivan

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Helen Forgasz, Tasos Barkatsas, Alan Bishop, Barbara Clarke, Stephen Keast, Wee Tiong Seah and Peter Sullivan