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An Interplay between Global and Local Perspectives
This volume attempts to review the historical development of Chinese Christianity from a “global-local” or “glocalization” perspective. It includes chapters on the Boxer Movement, Chinese indigenous movements, and Christian higher education and also contains seven biographical chapters. The author expounds upon the interplay of “universal” and “particular” aspects as well as the global and local forces which shaped the characteristics of Chinese Christianity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. This work focused on China could have wider implications for modern scholarship, both in the fields of comparative history of education and modern Chinese church history, for those scholars who are exploring the dialogical interplay between global and local Christianities.

Abstract

This article aims to apply the concept of 'glocalization' to the study of theology and culture. China is chosen as a case study, with particular focus on a Chinese theologians discussion of the interplay between Christianity and Chinese Culture in the early twentieth century China. Francis Wei was the first Chinese President of Huazhong University in Wuhan, 1929–1952, and he was appointed as the first Henry Luce Visiting Professor of World Christianity in 1945–46. Wei's conviction was that Christianity and Chinese culture could be complementary. He held that China needed Christianity for a better understanding of God's nature and the way human beings could communicate with God, while maintaining that Christianity needed China to move beyond western denominationalism. Moreover, Christianity could not become a universal religion without including China. This article argues that Wei's work is relevant to the contemporary discussion about interaction between globalization and localization, known as 'glocalization'.

In: International Journal of Public Theology
In: Chinese Christianity
In: Chinese Christianity
In: Chinese Christianity