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Malay Language, Jawi Script, and Islamic Factionalism from the 19th Century to the Present
In this monograph Philipp Bruckmayr examines the development of Cambodia’s Muslim minority from the mid-19th to the 21st century. During this period Cambodia’s Cham and Chvea Muslims established strong relationships with Malay centers of Islamic learning in Patani, Kelantan and Mecca. During the 1970s to the early 1990s these longstanding relationships came to a sudden halt due to civil war and the systematic Khmer Rouge repression. Since the 1990s ties to the Malay world have been revived and new Islamic currents, including Salafism and Tablighism, have left their mark on contemporary Cambodian Islam. Bruckmayr traces how these dynamics resulted inter alia in a history of local Islamic factionalism, culminating in the eventual state recognition of two separate Islamic congregations in the late 1990s.

Abstract

Despite rap music being associated with lifestyles perceived as antithetical to Islamic norms, Islam has always played an important role on the American rap scene. The distinctly modern discourse of Islam as the original religion of African Americans has provided a highly influential tool for the construction of a Black identity in clear contradistinction to white mainstream society and its projections of blackness. This chapter argues that the modern Muslim subjectivities amongst consciously Muslim rap artists are best understood through the lens of narrative identity formation and identification of processes of bricolage deriving their coherence from narrativization.

In: Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity

Abstract

Despite rap music being associated with lifestyles perceived as antithetical to Islamic norms, Islam has always played an important role on the American rap scene. The distinctly modern discourse of Islam as the original religion of African Americans has provided a highly influential tool for the construction of a Black identity in clear contradistinction to white mainstream society and its projections of blackness. This chapter argues that the modern Muslim subjectivities amongst consciously Muslim rap artists are best understood through the lens of narrative identity formation and identification of processes of bricolage deriving their coherence from narrativization.

In: Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity
In: Monotheismus
In: Cambodia’s Muslims and the Malay World
In: Cambodia’s Muslims and the Malay World