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At his death in 1959, Felix Jacoby left to posterity a monumental work assembling the fragments of more than 870 Greek historians. Yet the sheer bulk of the material and the lack of transparency of the plan make the Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker difficult to use and it is often avoided by students.
The three indexes now published are the first fruits of an indexation project which aims to facilitate access to the corpus of fragments and to improve its usefulness. Index no. 1 places all sources of fragments in a list alphabetized by author and work, index no. 2 follows the order of presentation found in Jacoby, while index no. 3 places the authors of fragments in alphabetical order and gives under each one an alphabetized list of authors who cite him.
The practical advantages are clear. Index no. 1 allows the reader to find his way from a fragment he has come across in his reading to the entry in Jacoby: he can then situate it within the lost work and note Jacoby’s comment on it. Index no. 3 offers a complete resolution of Jacoby’s abbreviations, which are often obscure and sometimes inconsistent. It also returns to their right place the often overlooked fragmenta and testimonia given by Jacoby in the addenda. In general, the indexes make it a simple matter to ascertain which historians had read (or not read) the works, now lost, of their predecessors, thus throwing light on the contents of libraries as well as the transmission of historical texts and their lifespan.

Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker is available in print, and now also online as part of the online reference work Jacoby Online. Please click here for more details.
At his death in 1959, Felix Jacoby left to posterity a monumental work assembling the fragments of more than 870 Greek historians. Yet the sheer bulk of the material and the lack of transparency of the plan make the Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker difficult to use and it is often avoided by students.
The three indexes now published are the first fruits of an indexation project which aims to facilitate access to the corpus of fragments and to improve its usefulness. Index no. 1 places all sources of fragments in a list alphabetized by author and work, index no. 2 follows the order of presentation found in Jacoby, while index no. 3 places the authors of fragments in alphabetical order and gives under each one an alphabetized list of authors who cite him.
The practical advantages are clear. Index no. 1 allows the reader to find his way from a fragment he has come across in his reading to the entry in Jacoby: he can then situate it within the lost work and note Jacoby’s comment on it. Index no. 3 offers a complete resolution of Jacoby’s abbreviations, which are often obscure and sometimes inconsistent. It also returns to their right place the often overlooked fragmenta and testimonia given by Jacoby in the addenda. In general, the indexes make it a simple matter to ascertain which historians had read (or not read) the works, now lost, of their predecessors, thus throwing light on the contents of libraries as well as the transmission of historical texts and their lifespan.

Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker is available in print, and now also online as part of the online reference work Jacoby Online. Please click here for more details.
Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker is available in print, and now also online as part of the online reference work Jacoby Online. Please click here for more details.
In: Myths, Martyrs, and Modernity
Cultes et mythes d'une cité béotienne au miroir de la mentalité antique
The oracle of Trophonios at Lebadeia (Boiotia), among the best documented in Greece, was active from the archaic period to the third century AD. At this oracle, divine revelation was given in the form of a ‘visionary trance’, experienced as a psychic journey or leap of the soul into the world of truth. From the beginning, the cult and legend of Trophonios (and of similar heroes) turned upon the boundary between ‘the other world’ and the here-and-now, and were intimately linked with psychagogy, divination (including iatromancy), and the mysteries. The analysis of each of the oracle's components in the light of ancient mentalities has broadened our understanding of both Trophonios and of Greek divination in general.
In: Trophonios de Lébadée
In: Trophonios de Lébadée
In: Trophonios de Lébadée
In: Trophonios de Lébadée