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Informed by an anti-colonial spirit of resistance to injustices, this book series examines the ways and the degree to which the legacy of colonialism continues to influence the content of school curriculum, shape teachers’ teaching practices, and impact the outcome of the academic success of students, including students of color. Further, books published in this series illuminate the manner in which the legacy of colonialism remains one of the root causes of educational and socio-economic inequalities. This series also analyzes the ways and the extent to which such legacy has been responsible for many forms of classism that are race- and language-based. By so doing, this series illuminates the manner in which race intersects with class and language affecting the psychological, educational, cultural, and socio-economic conditions of historically and racially disenfranchised communities. All in all, this series highlights the ways and the degree to which the legacy of colonialism along with race-language-class- and gender-based discrimination continue to affect the existence of people, particularly people of color.
Haiti and Other Oppressed Nations Under Western Neocolonial, Neoliberal, and Imperialist Dominations
In this book, the author critically analyzes the wide-ranging effects of western neo-colonial and neo-liberal economic and political policies on Haiti and other oppressed nations. The author’s overarching argument is that western colonization of these countries has taken a different form with a disguised mask. Further, the author contends that this form of colonization and “new” occupation has been made possible through the control of the economic and political apparatus of these disfranchised nations and the ideological domination of people living there, often maintained through canonical texts and institutions such as schools, the army, the media, and churches. The author situates this new form of occupation of Haiti by western imperialist powers in the context of western neo-liberal economic and political policies. Finally, critically analyzing the Haiti’s school system, which he argues is colonial-based, the author demonstrates how students living in this island have been mis-educated to internalize and reproduce western values, beliefs, and norms at the expense of their own.
The Heavy Price of Living in a Neocolonized and Globalized World
Whose Definition? An Ethnographic Study Examining the Literacy [under] Development of English Language Learners in the Era of High-Stakes Tests
A Biographical Account of Racial, Class, and Gender Inequities in the Americas
Using auto-ethnography as a methodological framework, this book captures two diametrical poles of the author’s experiences growing up poor and being educated in a colonial school system in a developing country and currently working as a university professor in the United States. The author begins by recollecting his mixed childhood and adolescence experiences, including being subjected to abject poverty, escaping a sexual predator as a teenager, witnessing class, gender, and sexual inequities, while at the same time being supported by family, neighbours, and friends in his community. Next, the author talks about the social class privileges that he has enjoyed as a result of becoming a university professor while juxtaposing such privileges to micro-aggression, systemic racism, xenophobia, linguicism, and elitism that he has been facing in society, including in the Ivy Halls of White America.
In: The Occupier and the ""New"" Occupied
In: The Occupier and the ""New"" Occupied
In: The Occupier and the ""New"" Occupied
In: The Occupier and the ""New"" Occupied
In: The Occupier and the ""New"" Occupied