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In: Discussing Modernity
In: Interpreting Globalization
The main hypothesis of the volume is that globalization is a cultural phenomenon. Therefore, the book offers an explanation of how globalization emerged from cultural exchange between groups, nations, and religions. The articles in this volume register the thematically multi-dimensional and theoretically complex contribution of Polish research on globalization. Polish debates on globalization, as presented in this book, on the one hand reflect international disputes and controversies, and on the other hand address local issues. As their crucial feature, the articles in this volume exhibit a special sensitivity to historical and contemporary cultural contexts. They do not approach globalization as an abstract process, instead exploring it through the lens of clearly defined factors.
In: Interpreting Globalization

The first part of the volume consists of three articles authored, respectively, by a philosopher, a sociologist, and a musicologist, who analyze various theoretical concepts informing cultural research on globality. In Leszek Kopciuch’s text, globalization, generality, and universality are the most important notions. Franciszek Czech examines the term “global studies” itself by tracing its evolution, identifying its central research problem, and trying to define its position within the social sciences. The last article, Bożena Muszkalska’s “Musicology and Globalization,” outlines globalization processes in musical cultures as framed by the specialist musicological literature.

In: Interpreting Globalization

The last part of the volume is comprised of texts devoted to our contemporary global phenomena. Daniela Boćkowski’s article addresses the response of the world of Islam and the entire Arab world to ubiquitous globalization. Adam Nobis explores the emergence of new kinds and models of money to conclude that locality should not be identified with a concrete place. The article contributed by Karolina Golinowska analyzes the relevance of contemporary global processes to cultural politics. Piotr J. Fereński discusses the political role of cities in the context of globalization. Authored by Rafał Nahirny, the closing article of this part looks into Doug Rickard’s artistic project A New American Picture.

In: Interpreting Globalization

The authors of articles in the second part of the volume scrutinize cultural phenomena which are analyzed by means of tools used in global studies. Mirosław Kocur expands performance studies by adding a globally and historically oriented perspective. Stanisław Rosik uses the global-studies perspective to analyze medieval sources. Piotr Badyna looks for manifestations of globality in the work of Charles Darwin. Magdalena Barbaruk’s article concerns the “Spanish Crisis of the 17th Century” and depicts two dominant approaches to this development, both of them associated with globalization in their separate ways. Tadeusz Paleczny’s text is devoted to examining nation-building processes in Latin American countries.

In: Interpreting Globalization