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Piotr Urbański

Abstract

The present article opens with the statement of Pliny the Elder that dogs are the only creatures besides humans who react to their name. The aim of the contribution is to provide some examples and to analyze the model of relationship between man and dog in early modern Latin poems, focusing on lap-dogs (in Latin: catellus, -i, meaning also “puppy, young dog”). The collected material allows us not only to offer exemplification but also to suggest some general statements especially on its symbolic meaning. The second issue considered in this paper is the use of classical tradition: the use of the same phrases and topoi to express certain feelings, notably grief in funeral laments, is evidence of effacing the border between a nonhuman animal and a human being. The comparative materials are some cynological Latin treatises and another text on dogs.

Open Access

Yasmin Haskell

Prescribing Ovid: The Latin Works and Networks of the Enlightened Dr Heerkens. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013. Pp. 280. Hb, $110.00.

Piotr Urbański

Open Access

Krzysztof Fordoński and Piotr Urbański

The presence of the Society of Jesus in the culture of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the period 1564–1773 was certainly one of the most important elements in the process of building the religious, cultural, and political identity of this multinational and multiconfessional state, one of the largest in Europe at the time. The authors sketch the most important trends in research on this subject matter and present the leading authors and their studies. They point out the recent departure from the historiography produced within the Society and the remnants of earlier, largely apologetic writings, towards the “hermeneutic turn” taking place at the moment. They explain their decisions concerning the contents of the present issue of JJS, aimed at filling gaps in the knowledge of English-speaking scholars caused by the fact that the majority of studies concerning the activities of Jesuits in the Commonwealth are published in Polish and Lithuanian.