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In: Multiple State Membership and Citizenship in the Era of Transnational Migration
In: Multiple State Membership and Citizenship in the Era of Transnational Migration
In: Multiple State Membership and Citizenship in the Era of Transnational Migration
In: Multiple State Membership and Citizenship in the Era of Transnational Migration
In: Multiple Citizenship as a Challenge to European Nation-States
In: Multiple Citizenship as a Challenge to European Nation-States
In: Multiple Citizenship as a Challenge to European Nation-States
Conventional thinking maintains that people can belong to only one society and can be loyal to only one nation-state. In a world with rising rates of trans-national migration, however, the possibility of participation, belonging, and loyalty to more than one state is ever more evident. This has led to a rethinking of the notion of nation-based citizenship and increased tolerance toward holding citizenship in more than one country. In practice, over half of the world’s nation-states currently recognize some form of dual citizenship or dual nationality. This book focuses on clarifying and comparing how the rules of acquisition, maintenance, and revocation of dual citizenship have been modified and justified in eight states associated with the European Union: Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. The main question is: How have the rules of attribution, loss and/or acquisition of dual citizenship been modified and justified in these eight states? Viewed in the context of international covenants, legislation regarding dual and multiple citizenship is analyzed in terms of how it is made tangible in juridical, social, cultural, and educational domains.
Once a rare phenomenon, multiple state membership and multinational citizenship has become almost commonplace with the rise in transnational mobility. This compilation analyses transnational participation focusing mainly on the interests of individual people and their transnational networks. The focus lies on the perceptions, attitudes, experiences and views on membership and participation of people with dual/multiple citizenship and individuals with multinational background who hold a single citizenship. Eight contributions present findings from the international research project Dual Citizenship, Governance and Education: A Challenge to the European Nation-State (DCE) conducted in 2002-2006 in Britain, France, Portugal, Germany, Finland, Greece, Estonia, and Israel.
In: Multiple State Membership and Citizenship in the Era of Transnational Migration