Abraham P. Bos and Rein Ferwerda, Aristotle, On the Life-Bearing Spirit (De Spiritu). A Discussion with Plato and his Predecessors on Pneuma as the Instrumental Body of the Soul (G. Groenewoud) Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski, The Philosophy of Religion: An Historical Introduction (A. Vroom) Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion (J. de Ridder) Lambert Zuidervaart, Social Philosophy after Adorno (R. Hayward)

In: Philosophia Reformata
In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

Abstract

I write my comments on Von Laue's encomium to Stalin's "Tragic greatness" not as a specialist in Soviet affairs but as someone primarily concerned with humanizing the practice and possibilities of contemporary world politics. In reacting to his essay, first let me applaud Von Laue's effort to convey a "compassionate understanding" of Stalin's evil "greatness." Secondly, I shall comment critically on his standards for judging, or refraining from judging, Stalin's political greatness and moral responsibility. Thirdly, I shall address certain issues which these views raise when reapplied to the contemporary Soviet-American foreign policy context from which they originate.

In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
In: Septuagint, Targum and Beyond
In: The Book of Genesis
In: New Heaven and New Earth. Prophecy and the Millennium

Summary

Some researchers maintain that one of the primary functions of religion is to help individuals develop a strong sense of connectedness with other people. However, there is little research on how a sense of connectedness arises. The purpose of this study is to examine this issue. A conceptual model is developed to test the following key hypotheses: (1) blacks are more likely than whites to affiliate with Conservative Christian denominations; (2) Conservative Christians attend worship services more often than individuals in other faith traditions; (3) people who go to church more often are more likely to receive informal spiritual support i.e., encouragement to adopt religious beliefs and practices); (4) individuals who receive more spiritual support are more likely to read religious literature and watch or listen to religious programs; and (5) people who engage in these private religious practices are more likely to feel a close sense of religiously based connectedness with others. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey provides support for each hypothesis.

In: Archive for the Psychology of Religion

Summary

Research indicates that positive relationships with fellow church members are associated with better mental health. However, far less research has focused on the relationship between negative interaction with fellow church members and mental health outcomes. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between church-based negative interaction and depressive symptoms with data from a nationwide sample of older Mexican Americans. Statistically significant findings were found for the following core relationships in our study model: (1) older Mexican Americans who encounter negative interaction with fellow church members experience more doubts about their faith; (2) older Mexican Americans who experience more doubts about their faith are more likely to expect transgressors to perform acts of contrition (i.e., make amends); and (3) older Mexican Americans who require transgressors to perform acts of contrition are more likely to experience symptoms of depression. Subsequent empirical analyses provide support for each of these relationships.

In: Archive for the Psychology of Religion