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In: The Language Environment of First Century Judaea
In: Jesus’ Last Week
In: Jesus’ Last Week
In: The Gospels in First-Century Judaea
In: The Gospels in First-Century Judaea
In: The Language Environment of First Century Judaea
In: The Language Environment of First Century Judaea
In: The Language Environment of First Century Judaea
The articles in this collection demonstrate that a change is taking place in New Testament studies. Throughout the twentieth century, New Testament scholarship primarily worked under the assumption that only two languages, Aramaic and Greek, were in common use in the land of Israel in the first century. The current contributors investigate various areas where increasing linguistic data and changing perspectives have moved Hebrew out of a restricted, marginal status within first-century language use and the impact on New Testament studies. Five articles relate to the general sociolinguistic situation in the land of Israel during the first century, while three articles present literary studies that interact with the language background. The final three contributions demonstrate the impact this new understanding has on the reading of Gospel texts.
A Triglott Edition with Notes and Commentary
One of the challenging tasks for archaeologists and biblical historians alike is the identification of sites mentioned in the Bible—some of which were destroyed and disappeared in time without a trace. The first comprehensive attempt to locate these places was that of Eusebius, the bishop of Caesarea and fourth-century church historian (ca. 260-339 CE). In his Onomasticon Eusebius cataloged most of the cities, sites and regions mentioned in the Old and New Testaments. Supplementing his list when possible, Eusebius provided detailed information concerning the sites’ history and location, including their distances in Roman miles from other well-known metropolitan centers in fourth century Palestine.
The Onomasticon of Eusebius is the most important book for the study of the Land of Israel in the Roman period. Scholars and students alike will find his work indispensable for an understanding the physical settings of the biblical narrative.