In: Muscling in on New Worlds
In: The New Jewish Argentina
In: Shifting Frontiers of Citizenship: The Latin American Experience
In: Returning to Babel
Essays on Ethnicity, Identity, and Diaspora
The essays gathered here challenge essentialist concepts and overemphasis on Jewish particularity, as well as the common discourse of Jewish victimology. At the same time, they reveal how the Jews, like other ethnic groups, are not monolithic but fragmented by place of origin, social class, political ideologies, and gender.

The topics discussed include the non-political Zionism espoused by Sephardic Jews during the first half of the 20th century, Argentine neutrality during World War II, the entry of Nazi war criminals to Argentina, the regime of Juan Perón and its attitudes towards Jewish-Argentines and the state of Israel, the reactions of Jews to the anti-Semitic wave in Argentina following the kidnapping of Adolf Eichman by Mossad agents, the Latin American community in Israel, and protests by Argentine exiles in Israel against the 1978 world-cup soccer games, played in Argentina during a brutal military regime.

This book is also available in paperback.

"... Argentine Jews or Jewish Argentines?: Essays on Ethnicity, Identity and Diaspora is a critical contribution encouraging more subtle approaches to studying the identities of Jewish populations in Latin America." Steven Hyland Jr., Wingate University
In: Identities in an Era of Globalization and Multiculturalism
Issues and Methods
Editor: Raanan Rein
Jewish Latin America: Issues and Methods aims at expanding the boundaries of this field of inquiry devoted to Jewish experiences in Latin America and the Caribbean. Open to original studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, it hopes to transcend disciplinary borders. This new series welcomes research on a variety of issues and groups that have not received sufficient attention in the historiography. Thus, for example, both affiliated and non-affiliated Jews will be considered, as well as Zionists and non-Zionists, and Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews. Gender and social issues and popular culture will also figure prominently.

A comparative approach, challenging particularistic emphases, is encouraged, as well as studies of national vs. trans-national ties, and new approaches to the study of ethnicity and Diaspora. Attention will be given not only to the bigger communities of Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico but also to smaller communities in Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Both monographic studies and edited volumes will be published. All manuscripts will be peer reviewed before publication.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
In: The New Ethnic Studies in Latin America
In: A Road to Nowhere?
In: The New Jewish Argentina