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In: How Prophecy Lives
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 28
Editor-in-Chief: Ralph W. Hood
As of 2021, Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Psychology is no longer published as a journal by Brill, but will continue as a book series. Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Psychology presents extended articles focused on theory and the integration of empirical data that bridge the gap between humanities studies and those of psychological science. Firm boundaries associated with disciplines concerned with religion and psychology are difficult to define and rapidly developing research strategies are in need of critical in-depth presentation that explores how various approaches to psychology are contributing to a broader understanding of religion in what some have claimed is a secular and others a post-secular age.

This series will be directed to a wide audience of students, scholars, and active researchers seeking up-to-date information on the diversity of approaches and methods that psychologists are applying to illuminate the wide range of phenomenon that either define or are associated with religion in individual cultures and globally. Published quarterly, each peer-reviewed issue will consist of one uniquely focused article of approximately 40,000 words. Individual issues will also be made available as a standalone book in both print and electronic format.
This volume of Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion includes a wide range of papers from a social-science perspective. The special section gives a unique insight into the rapidly growing field of psychological studies of religion in China. It draws on experts from China and the USA who met for a conference at Fuller Theological Seminary and have together compiled a collection of original research and reviews that helps to locate the current state of the discipline from a specifically Chinese perspective. Other papers in the volume examine intergenerational religious transmission and religious problem-solving styles in the USA.
The general papers in Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 29 cover a range of topics including psychological type, prayer, nature and well-being, psychobiography, coping with addiction, and the role of place in spirituality. The first special section on congregational studies draws on a range of large datasets from the National Church Life Surveys in Australia. Papers examine the factors that predict individual sense of belonging in Catholic parishes as well as congregational-level aspects of vitality, collective confidence, and innovativeness. The second special section examines the Ideological Surround Model and how it can help to better understand expressions of faith related to psychological constructs such as mindfulness, fundamentalism, and the ‘Dark Triad’ of Machiavellianism, Narcissism, and Psychopathy.
This volume includes a wide range of papers that explore individual and institutional aspects of religion from a social-science perspective. The special section has articles related to the practice of prayer, and includes studies from the USA, Europe, and the Middle East. The general papers include studies on coping strategies, God representations, spirituality versus religion, self-control in a Muslim context, and faith-based organizations in Cambodia. Together these papers form a valuable collection indicating the depth and vibrancy of research in these fields.