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Author: Raphael Vella

Abstract

While collaborative practices continue to play an important role in the field of contemporary art, this chapter inquires into the ways ethical relations evolving out of artistic collaborations affect teaching and learning. An installation in Malta that brought together works and texts by over thirty artists based on islands around the Mediterranean region presents a scenario in which shared labour sets in motion reflections about islandness and escape, connectedness and misunderstanding. This installation leads to a more theoretical discussion, in which an ethics of the archipelago is proposed, revolving around experience, intersubjectivity and a critique of the notion of proficiency.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Author: Raphael Vella

Abstract

Joe Sacco is a Maltese-American comics journalist who combines reportage with graphic art to create works that are often based on experiences in conflict zones. In this interview, Sacco talks about his journalistic as well as his more satirical works, explaining the lengthy and difficult process involved in his approach to drawing and work of non-fiction. Sacco explores the issue of ‘balance’ and truth in journalism and discusses the relationship between comics and tragic circumstances depicted in some of his works, including the Charlie Hebdo attacks.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Author: Raphael Vella

Abstract

Taking cue from Allan Kaprow’s blurring of art and life, this chapter explores the postartistic thought of Jerzy Ludwiński and his links with the ideas of Marcel Duchamp. It then describes Paweł Althamer and Goshka Macuga’s The Venice Biennale in Bródno, in which the Polish artists re-baptised a neighbourhood as an exhibition or site-as-exhibition. Apart from the unconventional and tongue-in-cheek approach to the biennale format, their work confronted audiences with various ethical questions related to the singularity of each person’s experience and exchange of meanings. This unpredictable component is how art and education can avoid the limitations of an audit culture obsessed with accountability.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Chapter 16 An Ethics of the Archipelago
Author: Raphael Vella

Abstract

While collaborative practices continue to play an important role in the field of contemporary art, this chapter inquires into the ways ethical relations evolving out of artistic collaborations affect teaching and learning. An installation in Malta that brought together works and texts by over thirty artists based on islands around the Mediterranean region presents a scenario in which shared labour sets in motion reflections about islandness and escape, connectedness and misunderstanding. This installation leads to a more theoretical discussion, in which an ethics of the archipelago is proposed, revolving around experience, intersubjectivity and a critique of the notion of proficiency.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Chapter 22 How to Explore Something Nobody Will Notice
Author: Raphael Vella

Abstract

Taking cue from Allan Kaprow’s blurring of art and life, this chapter explores the postartistic thought of Jerzy Ludwiński and his links with the ideas of Marcel Duchamp. It then describes Paweł Althamer and Goshka Macuga’s The Venice Biennale in Bródno, in which the Polish artists re-baptised a neighbourhood as an exhibition or site-as-exhibition. Apart from the unconventional and tongue-in-cheek approach to the biennale format, their work confronted audiences with various ethical questions related to the singularity of each person’s experience and exchange of meanings. This unpredictable component is how art and education can avoid the limitations of an audit culture obsessed with accountability.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
Chapter 12 The Work Speaks for Itself
Author: Raphael Vella

Abstract

Joe Sacco is a Maltese-American comics journalist who combines reportage with graphic art to create works that are often based on experiences in conflict zones. In this interview, Sacco talks about his journalistic as well as his more satirical works, explaining the lengthy and difficult process involved in his approach to drawing and work of non-fiction. Sacco explores the issue of ‘balance’ and truth in journalism and discusses the relationship between comics and tragic circumstances depicted in some of his works, including the Charlie Hebdo attacks.

In: Art – Ethics – Education
In: Mediterranean Art and Education
Author: Raphael Vella
This book brings together interviews with twenty-one artist-teachers from different parts of the world, offering many insights into their identities, challenges and creative and pedagogic practices they have adopted. Based in a range of educational situations—from compulsory to post-secondary education, art schools, departments of art education and community-based environments—these educators discuss their own training in fine art and/or art education, research interests, teaching methods and theoretical outlooks, collaborative projects, students’ ambitions, exhibitions and the different approaches they use to connect their educational and artistic commitments. The discussions take place against a contextual backdrop that is tackled in every interview, bringing to the fore the impact of social, political, historical and institutional frameworks on artist-teachers. Illustrated with images of works and projects by each artist-teacher in the book, the volume combines the visual and the verbal in a way that reflects the complex experiences and identities of the interviewees.

Raphael Vella is a Senior Lecturer in Art Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Malta. Apart from coordinating and teaching in art education courses, he also teaches courses in fine art and theory. His publications address the relationships between contemporary artistic practices and education, art education in the Mediterranean, identity in art education, photography and cultural studies, and arts-based research. He is also actively involved in the curation of international and Maltese exhibitions and cultural events, and in recent years he initiated projects such as Divergent Thinkers (aimed at creating a platform for emerging artists based in Malta) and the Valletta International Visual Arts festival (VIVA). He is also a practising artist, having shown his work in many contexts, including Malta, Venice, Warsaw, Tokyo, Reims, Buenos Aires, Nicosia and Oxford.
In: Artist-Teachers in Context
In: Artist-Teachers in Context