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This paper discusses the identity, values, and standards of behaviour and the religious education of young Muslims in the Netherlands. After an intro-duction of the theme, the results are presented of a study among 30 young highly educated Muslim young adults between the ages of 19 and 28. For these young people, being a Muslim is at the core of their identity. This identity offers them the freedom to escape from the dilemma between being Dutch and belonging to their own culture and gives them the opportunity to understand the world around them in a positive but, at the same time, critical way. The paper also looks at an inquiry among a group of boys between 12 and 18 years of age on the street. To them, being a Muslim is also highly important, but religion and culture, even street culture, seem to be even more interwoven in their minds and behaviour.

In: Reaching for the Sky
Author:

This paper discusses the identity, values, and standards of behaviour and the religious education of young Muslims in the Netherlands. After an intro-duction of the theme, the results are presented of a study among 30 young highly educated Muslim young adults between the ages of 19 and 28. For these young people, being a Muslim is at the core of their identity. This identity offers them the freedom to escape from the dilemma between being Dutch and belonging to their own culture and gives them the opportunity to understand the world around them in a positive but, at the same time, critical way. The paper also looks at an inquiry among a group of boys between 12 and 18 years of age on the street. To them, being a Muslim is also highly important, but religion and culture, even street culture, seem to be even more interwoven in their minds and behaviour.

In: Reaching for the Sky
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Abstract

Firstly, this article addresses the influence of the story of the Anglo-Saxon singer Caedmon by Bede on two texts about religious poets on the continent: the Bernlef episodes in the Lives of Liudger and the Heliand Prefaces. Secondly, the question will be addressed whether a connection between the Heliand Prefaces and the Bernlef episodes can be found. Finally, a new light is shed on the discussion about the identity of the poet of the Heliand.

The result of a comparison between the profiles of the Heliand poet and Bernlef is as follows: 1) they were laymen, the Heliand poet at least at the time of his divine vocation; 2) they were held in great esteem by their people/neighbours as a poet/singer; 3) they were considered the best/a very good poet in the Thiudisc language; 4) after a divine miracle they focus on the adaptation of passages from the Holy Scripture; 5) the testimony of these miracles should not be doubted because of the ‘studium’ of the poets; 6) references to the story of Caedmon by Bede; 7) tradition of their stories on the continent between approximately 845 and 875.

These similarities could imply that Bernlef was the author of the Heliand. At the very least, the poet of the Heliand (according to the Prefaces) was someone that closely resembled Bernlef.

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In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
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Abstract

The usual meaning of folcscare in Beowulf l. 73 is “nation”, while feorum gumena refers to human lives. It seems impermissible for Hrothgar to either give away or divide his nation or to sacrifice a human life as a reward for his retinues. In the story of Herod and John the Baptist in the Gospel, the “bad” king Herod seems to promise or give what should be taboo for the “good” king Hrothgar. This story possibly resounds in l. 73.

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In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik