Editor: Rem B. Edwards
Formal Axiology and Its Critics consists of two parts, both of which present criticisms of the formal theory of values developed by Robert S. Hartman, replies to these criticisms, plus a short introduction to formal axiology.
Part I consists of articles published or made public during the lifetime of Hartman to which he personally replied. It contains previously published replies to Hector Neri Castañeda, William Eckhardt, and Robert S. Brumbaugh, and previously unpublished replies to Charles Hartshorne, Rem B. Edwards, Robert E. Carter, G.R. Grice, Nicholas Rescher, Robert W. Mueller, Gordon Welty, Pete Gunter, and George K. Plochmann in an unfinished but now completed article on which Hartman was working at the time of his death in 1973.
Part II consists of articles presented at recent annual meetings of the R.S. Hartman Institute for Formal and Applied Axiology that continue to criticize and further develop Hartman's formal axiology. An article by Rem B. Edwards raises serious unanswered questions about formal axiology and ethics. Another by Frank G. Forrest shows how the formal value calculus based on set theory might answer these questions, and an article by Mark A. Moore points out weaknesses in the Hartman/Forrest value calculus and develops an alternative calculus based upon the mathematics of quantum mechanics.
While recognizing that unsolved problems remain, the book intends to make the theoretical foundations and future promise of formal axiology much more secure.
Author: Rem B. Edwards
This book critically explores answers to the big question, What produced our universe around fifteen billion years ago in a Big Bang? It critiques contemporary atheistic cosmologies, including Steady State, Oscillationism, Big Fizz, Big Divide, and Big Accident, that affirm the eternity and self-sufficiency of the universe without God. This study defends and revises Process Theology and arguments for God's existence from the universe's life-supporting order and contingent existence.
Author: Leon Pomeroy
Editor: Rem B. Edwards
This book uses scientific validity measures to create empirical value science and a normative new science of axiological psychology by integrating cognitive psychology with Robert S. Hartman’s formal theory of axiological science. It reveals a scientific way to identify and rank human values, achieving values appreciation, values clarification, and values measurement for the twenty first century.
Author: Armando Molina
Editor: Rem B. Edwards
This book develops a remarkable axiological characterology of healthy personality types, distortions, and styles of sexual attachment. It synthesizes the author's profound understanding of human nature, recent psychological interpretations of the ancient Enneagram, and insights into connections between values and psychology drawn from Robert S. Hartman's formal theory of value. It shows how personalities are differentiated by the ways they manifest Hartman's three dimensions of value: intrinsic, extrinsic, and systemic. It shows how these correlate with nine personality types identified by Enneagram interpreters. Human personalities differ with respect to the ways in which intrinsic, extrinsic, and systemic values are developed (or not developed) and ordered (as dominant or subordinate) within individuals by nature and/or nurture. The book shows how personality distortions are grounded in perversions of value orientation. It shows how a value-based approach to character disorders can be linked to moral vices and to many familiar diagnostic and therapeutic psychological categories like obsession, hysteria, schizophrenia, neurosis, and various addictions. It explains the many ways in which value orientations are expressed in sexual attitudes and relations, and how value-based character traits that dominate the non-sexual areas of our lives are carried over into the sexual areas.
This book features two old philosophical friends engaged in lively personal and intellectual conversations. Wary of any dogmatism, their dialogues explore the Big Bang and the joy of grandchildren, value theory and terrorism, God and art, metaphor and meaning, while assessing the thought of Robert S. Hartman, Alfred North Whitehead, Charles Hartshorne, H. Richard Niebuhr, and others.
This book presents Robert S. Hartman’s formal theory of value and critically examines many other twentieth century value theorists in its light, including A.J. Ayer, Kurt Baier, Brand Blanshard, Paul Edwards, Albert Einstein, William K. Frankena, R.M. Hare, Nicolai Hartmann, Martin Heidegger, G.E. Moore, P.H. Nowell-Smith, Jose Ortega y Gasset, Charles Stevenson, Paul W. Taylor, Stephen E. Toulmin, and J.O. Urmson.