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5 Human Resource Development for Junior Researchers in Germany
In: Under Pressure
Chapter 11 The Roles of Higher Education Managers in Germany

Abstract

In Germany, higher education (HE) managers belong to a group of personnel that is still in a process of definition and growth. They can be found in positions located between those traditionally defined in administration and research. In his organisational-theoretical approach, has highlighted that administrators, who were hitherto primarily responsible for the enforcement of rules, are now being transformed into strategic actors who can perform management tasks, prepare decisions and have room to manoeuvre. The newly-launched standardised online survey within the research project ‘KaWuM – Career paths and qualification requirements in HE management’, ask how far this apparent process of change has progressed: To what extent are higher education managers strategically active? What roles do they take on and how do they perceive themselves? Can this process be understood in terms of professionalisation? The survey data allow us to conclude that the newly created tasks in HE management do differ from the administrative tasks in a number of characteristics. The new group does perform different roles in the organisation and does have a greater scope of leeway than those who do not consider themselves as HE managers. The respondents themselves do confirm that they contribute to the strategic development of their organisation. Also, the formation and membership of professional networks point to a process of professionalisation of this group.

In: Sustaining the Future of Higher Education

Abstract

Students are often assumed to be “digital natives”, i.e., to be competent in the use of digital technologies. However, observations in the teaching context show that students do not (or cannot) necessarily transfer skills acquired in their leisure time to the study context. To provide concepts for developing appropriate teaching/learning quality and for the efficient use of corresponding technologies, a database is required to document students’ digital competences. We therefore refer to the European Reference Framework DigComp2.1 as a conceptual basis as well as selected results from surveys of several large universities in Germany. These conceptualise a new self-report questionnaire to assess digital competences. In this chapter, we first address the question how precisely digital competences can be assessed? Second, we stress the significance of digital competences in the first year of higher education under pandemic conditions. While it has been proven that self-efficacy is a predictor of study success, satisfaction and dropout intentions, this chapter attempts to examine the extent to which digital competences mediate this relationship when students experience their first year in higher education only in a virtual environment. For this purpose, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning the first year in higher education. Ultimately, a recording of digital competences serves as the basis for quality-enhancing concepts for higher education teaching to coordinate the sensible use of digital teaching/learning technologies with existing competences or to promote the acquisition of missing competences.

In: Transformation Fast and Slow
Digitalisation, Quality and Trust in Higher Education
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated change in the higher education sector across the globe and has required huge efforts and commitments on the political, institutional and individual level. During this period higher education was considered, maybe more than ever, as an essential sector. Providing critical information and, contributing to the delivery of scientifically based solutions to help societies overcome this global crisis, universities also simultaneously maintained core educational activities to secure the academic future of the next student generation. This required a high level of innovation, adaptivity and creativity. The book is centred on three main themes linked to transformation and change in higher education: digitalisation, quality and trust. The transformative power of the pandemic has raised concerns and questions of each of them.

Contributors are: Stephanie Albrecht, Tony Armstrong, Victoria Birmingham, Victor Borden, Bruno Broucker, Uwe Cantner, Helge Dauchert, Harry de Boer, Caterina Fox, Amanda French, Katharina Hölzle, Gunnar Grepperud, Seonmi Jin, Ben Jongbloed, Alex Kendall, Cindy Konen, René Krempkow, Anne-Kristin Langner, Theodor Leiber, Oddlaug Marie Lindgaard, Silke Masson, Clare Milsom, Jessica Nooij, Mark O’Hara, Matt O’Leary, Pascale Stephanie Petri, Rosalind Pritchard, Christopher Stolz, Elisabeth Suzen, Sara-I. Täger, Daniel Thiemann, Lieke van Berlo, Lotte J. van Dijk, Katy Vigurs, Tilo Wendler, and Tamara Zajontz.
In: Transformation Fast and Slow

Abstract

This volume is based upon a selection of papers that were presented at the online EAIR Forum in 2021. The book brings together scholars, practitioners and policymakers in higher education, and sets out the theme of transformation in three key areas: digitalisation, quality and trust. Herewith this volume presents a stimulating and careful analysis of the opportunities and associated challenges of transformation in higher education systems and institutions.

In: Transformation Fast and Slow
In: Transformation Fast and Slow
In: Transformation Fast and Slow