How can we start thinking about the link between indicators, international institutions and the law? This introductory note sets the scene for some of the crosscutting issues that emerge throughout the specific contributions, and proposes future venues of research. It focuses on four issues in particular, where the use of indicators challenges traditional narratives of international institutions and their use of the law: (a) Indicators as normative statements; (b) compliance with international norms; (c) the creation of new political spaces; and, (d) accountability.

In: International Organizations Law Review
International legal scholarship has traditionally celebrated the possibility of individuals being considered as subjects of international law. This book challenges that narrative, and reveals hidden patterns in the way we think about legal subjects in global governance. Building on the notion of a risk society, this book argues that international law creates fragmented subjectivities, whose conflicting identities help perpetuate a certain global loss of sense that is characteristic of our times. An innovative contribution that draws on a wealth of international legal materials (including human rights, EU law, international economic law, and international organizations), this book is useful to those with an interest in international legal theory, new approaches to international law, global constitutionalism, and global administrative law.
In: Handbook of Transnational Economic Governance Regimes
In: Handbook of Transnational Economic Governance Regimes
In: Handbook of Transnational Economic Governance Regimes
In: No Citizens Here: Global Subjects and Participation in International Law
In: No Citizens Here: Global Subjects and Participation in International Law
In: No Citizens Here: Global Subjects and Participation in International Law