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In: Hebräische Wortforschung
In: Dead Sea Discoveries
In: Hebräische Wortforschung
Author: Eric Reymond

Abstract

As noted by many scholars, the Wisdom of Solomon contains elements typical of both Greek and Hebrew literature. Numerous studies list specific Greek figures in the book, often making only passing reference to the Hebrew poetic features, referring to them with the single term parallelismus membrorum. But, Wisdom's form is a good deal more complex than these synopses suggest. Parallelism is realized in a number of ways in the Hebrew scriptures and its manifestation in this apocryphal book is a unique combination of different patterns. The present study aims at a detailed description of Wisdom's structure through a close study of the parallelism and verse length of the book's first 15 verses, and through a comparison of these patterns with those in Hebrew poems.

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author: Eric D. Reymond

Abstract

That a single scribe copied 1QS, 1QSa, 1QSb, 4Q53 (4QSamc), 4Q175 is commonly recognized. However, what has not been emphasized previously is that certain orthographic / phonological idiosyncrasies appear prominently, if not exclusively, in only one of these texts, 1QS, even though these idiosyncrasies would seem to be involuntary and, for this reason, should appear evenly distributed throughout the texts. Instead, one finds the greatest correspondence in type and concentration in 1QIsaa, though this was copied by different scribes. The three idiosyncratic features studied are the Aramaic והי- suffix on plural nouns, the he in the prefix of hiphil yiqṭol verbs, and the interchange of gutturals.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: Eric D. Reymond

Abstract

Certain words in the prayer of Sir 36:1–22 that appear to be secondary exhibit nationalistic and eschatological tones that are otherwise alien to the book of Ben Sira. These elements likely reflect the interpretation and reading of the text in the course of its transmission in the first millennium CE. In its present form, therefore, the nationalistic/eschatological themes are accented in a way that might not have been the case in earlier versions.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries