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'Totally un-English'?

Britain’s Internment of ‘Enemy Aliens’ in Two World Wars

Edited by Richard Dove

The internment of ‘enemy aliens’ by the British government in two world wars remains largely hidden from history. British historians have treated the subject – if at all - as a mere footnote to the main narrative of Britain at war. In the ‘Great War’, Britain interned some 30,000 German nationals, most of whom had been long-term residents. In fact, internment brought little discernible benefit, but cruelly damaged lives and livelihoods, breaking up families and disrupting social networks. In May 1940, under the threat of imminent invasion, the British government interned some 28,000 Germans and Austrians, mainly Jewish refugees from the Third Reich. It was a measure which provoked lively criticism, not least in Parliament, where one MP called the internment of refugees ‘totally un-English’. The present volume seeks to shed more light on this still submerged historical episode, adopting an inter-disciplinary approach to explore hitherto under-researched aspects, including the historiography of internment, the internment of women, deportation to Canada, and culture in internment camps, including such notable events as the internment revue What is Life!
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Edited by Richard Dove and Ian Wallace

All Hitler’s political opponents in exile sought to devise plans for the post-war future of Germany, Austria or Czechoslovakia. This volume brings together the different, often divergent proposals of groups and individuals in British exile and evaluates their contribution to actual post-war developments. Different essays trace the activities of the Free German Movement and its Austrian counterpart in evolving plans for the future of their countries or deal with the response of individuals such as Kurt Hiller or Friedrich Stampfer. Others consider the return of Socialist exiles to Austria or the involvement of exiles in Britain in the re-education of German prisoners of war. Ultimately, all plans for post-war Europe were trumped by the emerging Cold War, as Germany became the stage for enacting the political ambitions of the rival powers which had conquered it. Against this background, few of the hopes nurtured in exile came to fruition.
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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Richard Dove

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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Richard Dove