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'Totally un-English'?

Britain’s Internment of ‘Enemy Aliens’ in Two World Wars

Edited by Richard Dove

The internment of ‘enemy aliens’ by the British government in two world wars remains largely hidden from history. British historians have treated the subject – if at all - as a mere footnote to the main narrative of Britain at war. In the ‘Great War’, Britain interned some 30,000 German nationals, most of whom had been long-term residents. In fact, internment brought little discernible benefit, but cruelly damaged lives and livelihoods, breaking up families and disrupting social networks. In May 1940, under the threat of imminent invasion, the British government interned some 28,000 Germans and Austrians, mainly Jewish refugees from the Third Reich. It was a measure which provoked lively criticism, not least in Parliament, where one MP called the internment of refugees ‘totally un-English’. The present volume seeks to shed more light on this still submerged historical episode, adopting an inter-disciplinary approach to explore hitherto under-researched aspects, including the historiography of internment, the internment of women, deportation to Canada, and culture in internment camps, including such notable events as the internment revue What is Life!
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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Richard Dove

This volume focuses on the contribution of German-speaking refugees from Nazism to the performing arts in Britain, evaluating their role in broadcasting, theatre, film and dance from 1933 to the present. It contains essays evaluating the role of refugee artists in the BBC German Service, including the actor Martin Miller, the writer Bruno Adler and the journalist Edmund Wolf. Miller also made a career in the English theatre transcending the barrier of language, as did the actor Gerhard Hinze, whose transition to the English stage is an instructive example of adaptation to a new theatre culture. In film, language problems were mitigated by the technical possibilities of the medium, although stars like Anton Walbrook received coaching in English. Certainly, technicians from Central Europe, like the cameraman Wolf Suschitzky, helped establish the character of British film in the 1950s and 1960s. In dance theatre, language played little role, facilitating the influence in Britain of dance practitioners like Kurt Jooss and Sigurd Leeder. Finally, evaluating the reverse influence of émigrés on Germany, two essays discuss Erich Fried’s translations of Shakespeare and Peter Zadek’s early theatre career in Germany.
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Edited by Richard Dove and Ian Wallace

All Hitler’s political opponents in exile sought to devise plans for the post-war future of Germany, Austria or Czechoslovakia. This volume brings together the different, often divergent proposals of groups and individuals in British exile and evaluates their contribution to actual post-war developments. Different essays trace the activities of the Free German Movement and its Austrian counterpart in evolving plans for the future of their countries or deal with the response of individuals such as Kurt Hiller or Friedrich Stampfer. Others consider the return of Socialist exiles to Austria or the involvement of exiles in Britain in the re-education of German prisoners of war. Ultimately, all plans for post-war Europe were trumped by the emerging Cold War, as Germany became the stage for enacting the political ambitions of the rival powers which had conquered it. Against this background, few of the hopes nurtured in exile came to fruition.
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'Stimme der Wahrheit'

German-Language Broadcasting by the BBC

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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Richard Dove

The essays contained in this volume were originally delivered as papers to a conference on the German-language broadcasting of the BBC, held in London in 2002. For over sixty years, the BBC German Service was Britain's most authoritative voice to the German-speaking world, representing a virtual paradigm of British cultural and political attitudes towards Germany and Austria - and helping to define their perceptions of Britain and the British.
Despite the BBC's enormous cultural standing and influence, however, this volume is the first to evaluate the Corporation's German-language broadcasting since the BBC German Service was closed down in 1999. The essays fall into three broad categories: German-language broadcasting during the Second World War, broadcasting to Germany and Austria during the Cold War, and finally a series of personal accounts from former employees of the Service. The volume will be of interest to scholars and students of broadcasting (including media studies) as well as those involved in German Studies and in German and Austrian Exile Studies.