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In: Encyclopaedia Iranica Online
in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online
In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology
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The migration of North Caucasian peoples into Ottoman Anatolia during the early 1860s included some five thousand Muslim Ossetes who settled first in the Sarıkamış district and later moved further west. While today the descendants of these migrants may number as many as 60,000, most now live in the major urban centres of Istanbul and Ankara and have largely become assimilated into modern Turkish society. However, three villages in the Yozgat district east of Ankara, Boyalık, Karabacak and Poyrazli, have remained Ossetian-speaking up to the present day. This paper explores the circumstances though which the Ossetian language has survived in these villages 160 years after the migration, and what prospects exist for the continuation of a distinct Ossetian communal identity in Turkey.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
In: Caucasus Survey
Author:

The role of Iranian merchants in the maritime trade of the Indian Ocean basin from antiquity up to the 16th century is often underestimated. From scholarly histories to popular culture the “Muslim sailor” is typically portrayed as being an Arab. In fact, from pre-Islamic times the principal actors in Indian Ocean trade were predominantly Persian, as attested by the archaeological data, local written records, and the names of places and individuals.

In: Iran and the Caucasus
Author:

The Rekom Shrine located in the Tsey Valley of North Ossetia-Alania is one of the most important sites in the Ossetian popular religion, which in modern times is often referred to as the Uatsdin. The shrine is dedicated to Uastyrdzhi, an Ossetian cultic figure associated with the Christian St. George. Rekom is the site of a major festival held in mid-June, called Rekomy Bærægbon (Рекомы бæрæгбон), where certain aspects of the ritual may date back to Scythian times. These and similar ceremonies throughout North and South Ossetia are best understood as expressions of national identity and community solidarity.

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In: Iran and the Caucasus