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In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet
In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet

Abstract

This chapter has a two-fold purpose: to offer the first sustained academic examination of Smith’s only published novel, written entirely in a unique form of neologistic and punning wordplay and to give the reader a sense of the history of the development of the novel and its placing in Smith’s oeuvre. The only other existing writings on this book, apart from contemporary reviews and passing references in theses are rather uncritical appreciations by Hugh MacDiarmid, who considered it the Edinburgh equivalent of Joyce’s Dublin in Ulysses and Robert Garioch who praised it in the festschrift For Sydney Goodsir Smith. This chapter seeks to answer the following question – is this book merely an elaborate jeu d’esprit or does it make a deeper point about language?

In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet
Volume Editor: Richie McCaffery
Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet: Essays on His Life and Work offers the first substantial work to assess his life and writings since his premature death in 1975. Considered a major figure in the second wave of Hugh MacDiarmid’s ‘Scottish Literary Renaissance’, Smith’s unique body of work has largely fallen from critical discussion of post-war Scottish literature.

This book remedies this by showing how his work may have fallen out of favour, and then by reappraising his distinctive and varied achievements in poetry, drama, art and art criticism, the novel and translations. Early career and established academics explore the many strands of his work as the best way of giving this multifaceted literary figure renewed attention.

Abstract

This chapter has a two-fold purpose: to offer the first sustained academic examination of Smith’s only published novel, written entirely in a unique form of neologistic and punning wordplay and to give the reader a sense of the history of the development of the novel and its placing in Smith’s oeuvre. The only other existing writings on this book, apart from contemporary reviews and passing references in theses are rather uncritical appreciations by Hugh MacDiarmid, who considered it the Edinburgh equivalent of Joyce’s Dublin in Ulysses and Robert Garioch who praised it in the festschrift For Sydney Goodsir Smith. This chapter seeks to answer the following question – is this book merely an elaborate jeu d’esprit or does it make a deeper point about language?

In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet
In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet
In: Sydney Goodsir Smith, Poet