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Author: Robert Beekes
Author: Robert Beekes
A must-have research tool that should be on every classicist’s desk.

The first comprehensive etymological dictionary of Greek in the English language

Greek is among the most intensely and widely studied languages known. Since the publication of the last etymological dictionary of Greek, both the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European, and our knowledge of the Greek substrate have led to numerous, often surprising new insights into the history and formation of the Greek vocabulary.
This dictionary is a treasure trove covering 2000 years of Ancient Greek: from Mycenaean via Homer and the classical period to lexicographers, such as Hesychius (5th century A.D.).
It consists of 7500 entries with thoroughly revised etymologies. Each entry gives clear information about the origin of the Greek word and its first date of attestation. It further provides all etymologically relevant variants, dialectal forms, derivatives, compounds, and bibliographical references.
This dictionary is a truly indispensable tool for those in search of a deeper knowledge of the Greek vocabulary, its history and, therewith, a better understanding of the language.
Author: Robert Beekes
Before the arrival of the Indo-European Greeks in the area around the Aegean Sea, a non-Indo-European language was spoken there which was eventually replaced by Greek. Although no written texts exist in this Pre-Greek language, Robert Beekes shows that we can reconstruct elements of its phonology and morphology on the basis of the substantial amount of Pre-Greek vocabulary which was absorbed by Greek. In addition to the general characteristics of Pre-Greek, Beekes provides a complete overview of the evidence, comprising over 1100 Greek etyma which are certainly of Pre-Greek origin. The book thus opens a window on the first Pre-Indo-European language of prehistoric Europe to have left a trace in history.
Author: Robert Beekes

Abstract

We shall argue that Burkert's etymology deriving the name Apollo from a Dorian word for 'assembly', απελλα, is linguistically and historically impossible. This means that the possibility of Anatolian origin is open again. It is argued that Apollo is a Pre-Greek-Anatolian name. The expected proto-form of this name is found in the name Appaliunas, a god of Wilusa/Ilios mentioned in a Hittite letter. This strongly suggests Anatolian origin of the name. This is confirmed by the Homeric epithet αυκηγενηζ, which has long been recognised as an archaic formation meaning 'born in Lycia'. This fits well with the strong Anatolian connections of Apollo as well as his mother Leto and his sister Artemis. L'étymologie proposée par Burkert du mot Apollon comme dérivé du mot apella, 'assemblée', est impossible, pour des raisons linguistiques et historiques. Il est donc possible que le mot, et le dieu, est d'origine anatolienne. Le nom est pré-grecanatolien. La proto-forme expectée est trouveé dans le nom Appaliunas, dieu de Wilusa / Ilios mentionné dans une lettre hittite, ce qui est une belle confirmation d'une origine anatolienne. Ceci est confirmé par l'épithéte homérique Lukégenés, 'né en Lycie'. Une origine anatolienne est en accord avec les liens d'Apollon lui meme, sa mére Leto et sa soeur Artemis avec l'Anatolie.

In: Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
In: Evidence and Counter-Evidence: Essays in Honour of Frederik Kortlandt, Volume 1
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Mnemosyne
In: Evidence and Counter-Evidence: Essays in Honour of Frederik Kortlandt, Volume 1