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Robert E. Carter

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Maritime Interactions in the Arabian Neolithic

The Evidence from H3, As-Sabiyah, an Ubaid-related site in Kuwait

Excavations at H3, Kuwait, throw important new light on the economy of the Arabian Neolithic, the early history of seafaring and boat-building, and relations with Ubaid Mesopotamia. It is now clear that the inhabitants of the eastern seaboard of the Arabian Peninsula were active players in a complex network that linked Mesopotamia, the northern and southern Gulf and perhaps Iran during the 6th and 5th millennia BC. Excavations at H3, Kuwait, throw important new light on the economy of the Arabian Neolithic, the early history of seafaring and boat-building, and relations with Ubaid Mesopotamia. It is now clear that the inhabitants of the eastern seaboard of the Arabian Peninsula were active players in a complex network that linked Mesopotamia, the northern and southern Gulf and perhaps Iran during the 6th and 5th millennia BC.
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Richard Fletcher and Robert A. Carter

This paper is based on research undertaken for the Origins of Doha Project. It is a unique attempt to interrogate the construct of the Arab city against rigorously collected evidence and meticulous analysis of historical urban geography. We have found that Doha in its urban layout, physical development, architecture, and pre-oil demographics, combined its disparate cosmopolitan elements into a blend that probably typified the historic Gulf town, simultaneously encapsulating aspects of the generalised “Arab and Islamic town.” We have found strong structural principles at work in both the traditional and the early modern town, many of which correlate strongly with tribal social organisation, although the historic population of Doha was neither overwhelmingly tribal in character nor entirely Arab in origin. Rather, these constituted prevailing ideologies, social structures, and identities in a diverse and cosmopolitan population

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Robert Jackson, Chris Carter and Michael Tarsitano