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Author: Robert Waska
The theme of Dr. Robert Waska’s new book involves how all patients, whether neurotic, borderline, or psychotic, want their problems to ease and their stress to stop but unconsciously they avoid any real psychological change. They strive to maintain their psychic equilibrium regardless of how destructive it may be, in an effort to avoid the loss of what is known and to avoid the unknown pain or punishment that change might bring.
Each chapter provides the reader with a contemporary Kleinian focus on central theoretical and clinical concepts such as projective identification, enactment, transference, pathological organizations, and depressive or paranoid acting out. The reader then is shown the careful and thoughtful interpretive work necessary in these complex clinical situations.
Author: Robert Waska
This book explores the theoretical and technical aspects of Modern Kleinian Therapy with borderline, narcissistic, and psychotic patients who are in great psychological conflict and who struggle to find stable footing in the relational world. These are the patients who are most taxing and troubling for all therapists as they suffer greatly in life but tend to leave a great deal of suffering in their wake.
Throughout the book, the reader is provided a close up clinical view of what really takes place in psychoanalytic treatment with psychologically disorganized, predatory, or internally terrorized patients who often can barely begin or maintain a therapeutic relationship as they experience it as emotionally threatening, dangerous, and unbearable. Aspects of Kleinian theory are highlighted through examining very personal verbatim accounts from patients of their internal emotional experiences. And, Kleinian concepts and techniques are clinically demonstrated. Change is shown to be possible in situations that initially seem unchangeable and acceptance is shown to be reachable in situations that initially seem unbearable. While success can be fleeting or unreachable, the author shows how to best find the potential for therapeutic success and to learn from the failures or modest achievements so common with more difficult patients. In that sense, this book serves as inspiration and hope to all therapists working with borderline, narcissistic, and psychotic patients.
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches
In: Klein in the Trenches