Series:

Rogland

This new monograph on the Hebrew verb examines those instances in which the qatal form (the so-called "perfect" or suffix conjugation) appears to refer to present or future events. The "gnomic", "prophetic", and "performative" perfects are each treated in turn. This study is especially intended for Hebrew linguists and scholars of the Old Testament, but its results will be of interest to scholars of other Semitic languages as well.

Max Rogland

Abstract

This article investigates the lexical meaning of μακρουμειν in Luke 18:7 with a view to clarifying whether the verb means “to be patient or longsuffering” or “to delay or tarry”. The former meaning is well-attested in Greek sources, while evidence for the latter is sparse and is primarily supported by appeal to Sir 35:19 [22], in which μακρουμειν occurs in parallelism with βραδυνειν. After noting some of the limitations of parallelism as a lexicographical tool, the article examines the underlying Hebrew text of Sir 35:19. The verb μακρουμειν is used to render the hithpael of ℘ℑℵ, a verb which never indicates a “slowness to act” but rather refers to restraining or controlling oneself. Lexical evidence that μακρουμειν means “to delay or tarry” is therefore lacking; any sense of a temporal “delay” in Luke 18 or Sir 35 is to be attributed to the larger literary context and not to the semantics of the verb itself.

Max Rogland

Abstract

This study examines the peculiar narrative sequence in the Masoretic Text of 1 Kgs 19.11-13, in which Elijah appears to delay obeying the “still small voice”. It examines Josephus’ version of the account, which presents a different narrative sequence, arguing that it represents a reading of the Hebrew text that is grammatically and exegetically superior to the common interpretation.

Max Rogland

Abstract

This study argues that the verb מושׁ is used intransitively in Zech 3:9 with the sense of “to depart” and that the particle את is best interpreted as the preposition “with” rather than as the nota accusativi.