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Abstract

Many of the different Tibetan mantic techniques are concerned with the observation of omens, which, if interpreted correctly, offer information on what lies ahead. This article focuses chiefly on one of two short, stand-alone oneiromantic texts preserved in the bsTan ’gyur, the Svapnohana (rMi lam brtag pa, Tôh. no. 1749), whose authorship along with its Tibetan translation is attributed to the Indian Buddhist master Vibhūticandra (12th–13th cent.). Based on a presentation and analysis of the work’s content and the main subjects it addresses, an overview of the associations between signs and meanings is given. Attention is placed also on the relationship between the examination of dreams in the Svapnohana and the use of dream images in Tibetan and Indian works on meditative practices, thus placing the work in the broader context of Buddhist literature.

In: Glimpses of Tibetan Divination

Abstract

Many of the different Tibetan mantic techniques are concerned with the observation of omens, which, if interpreted correctly, offer information on what lies ahead. This article focuses chiefly on one of two short, stand-alone oneiromantic texts preserved in the bsTan ’gyur, the Svapnohana (rMi lam brtag pa, Tôh. no. 1749), whose authorship along with its Tibetan translation is attributed to the Indian Buddhist master Vibhūticandra (12th–13th cent.). Based on a presentation and analysis of the work’s content and the main subjects it addresses, an overview of the associations between signs and meanings is given. Attention is placed also on the relationship between the examination of dreams in the Svapnohana and the use of dream images in Tibetan and Indian works on meditative practices, thus placing the work in the broader context of Buddhist literature.

In: Glimpses of Tibetan Divination
In: The End(s) of Time(s)
Glimpses of Tibetan Divination: Past and Present is the first book of its kind, in that it contains articles by a group of eminent scholars who approach the subject matter by investigating it through various facets and salient historical figures.
Over the centuries, Tibetans developed many practices of prognostication and adapted many others from neighboring cultures and religions. In this way, Tibetan divination evolved into a vast field of ritual expertise that has been largely neglected in Tibetan Studies.
The Tibetan repertoire of divinatory techniques is rich and immensely varied. Accordingly, the specimen of practices discussed in this volume—many of which remain in use today—merely serve as examples that offer glimpses of divination in Tibet.

Contributors are Per Kværne, Brandon Dotson, Ai Nishida, Dan Martin, Petra Maurer, Charles Ramble, Donatella Rossi, Rolf Scheuermann, Alexander Smith, and Agata Bareja-Starzynska.