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Abstract

This article argues that when globalization is accompanied by such problems as religious intolerance, social injustice, poverty, disrespect for the human dignity and oppression, Catholics should address these challenges on a social and an academic level. The Catholic social tradition, as the single bearer of reflection on the meaning of the common good, envisions the idea of this common good in particularly useful ways by linking it to concepts of solidarity and justice. Furthermore, the Catholic Social Doctrine offers a vision of humanity which rejects intolerance and violence and proclaims that human life is sacred and that the dignity of the human person should be the foundation of a moral vision for society. In short, this article will expand how – from a Catholic intellectual and moral perspective on a globalized world – the concept of bonum commune can address contemporary social, cultural and religious problems.

In: Christian Faith, Philosophy & International Relations

This article argues that when globalization is accompanied by such problems as religious intolerance, social injustice, poverty, disrespect for the human dignity and oppression, Catholics should address these challenges on a social and an academic level. The Catholic social tradition, as the single bearer of reflection on the meaning of the common good, envisions the idea of this common good in particularly useful ways by linking it to concepts of solidarity and justice. Furthermore, the Catholic Social Doctrine offers a vision of humanity which rejects intolerance and violence and proclaims that human life is sacred and that the dignity of the human person should be the foundation of a moral vision for society. In short, this article will expand how – from a Catholic intellectual and moral perspective on a globalized world – the concept of bonum commune can address contemporary social, cultural and religious problems.

In: Philosophia Reformata