Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: Rong Liu x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: The China Society Yearbook, Volume 1 (2006)

Abstract

This paper first provides a description of the relationship between regional characteristics and the development model of secondary vocational education through a simple analytical framework. Then based on the perspective of regional vocational education, it discusses the four relationships between the present private secondly vocational education and its public counterpart, followed by an introduction to the status of different types of private secondary vocational schools based on investigations and studies. After that, international comparisons are made to reveal the underlying contradictions in the development of China’s secondary vocational education at present as well as the acute challenges confronting the Eastern and Midwest parts of China. At last, the authors provide specific suggestions on reforming the investment system, establishing a more open governance structure, and supporting the development of private vocational schools.

In: Chinese Research Perspectives on Educational Development, Volume 4

This article employs qualitative research methods to explore the urban adaptation and adaptation processes of Chinese migrant children. Through twenty-one in-depth interviews with migrant children, the researchers discovered: The participant migrant children showed a fairly high level of adaptation to the city; their process of urban adaptation emerged as three categories: the U-Type, the J-type, and the “flat line” type. Also explored were long-term acquisition of explicit behaviors, implicit notions, adaptation to the socio-cultural environment, and success in education as difficult aspects of adaptation. After comparing these three processes, the research team developed a theory of migrant children urban adaptation. It hypothesizes that during the urban adaptation process, migrant children will encounter four stages of development: excitement and curiosity, shock and resistance, exploration and adaptation, and finally integration and assimilation.

In: Frontiers of Education in China

ABSTRACT

The flow of xylem sap in bamboo is closely associated with metaxylem vessels and the pits in their cell walls. These pits are essential components of the water-transport system and are key intercellular pathways for transverse permeation of treatment agents related to utilization. Observations of metaxylem vessels and pits in moso bamboo culm internodes were carried out using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to examine mature bamboo fractures and resin casts. The results showed that bordered pits were distributed in relation to adjacent cell types with most pits between vessels and parenchyma cells and few pits between vessels and fibers of the bundle sheath. The pit arrangement was mainly opposite to alternate with apertures ranging from oval, flattened elliptical, or slit-like to coalescent. The vertical dimensions of inner apertures and outer apertures of the pits were about 0.9–2.7 μm and 1.1–3.8 μm, respectively. According to the relative position, and size difference between the inner apertures and their borders, the bordered pit shapes were categorized into three types, namely PI, PII and PIII (). Half-bordered pit pairs were observed between vessels and direct contact parenchyma cells. Most vessel elements possessed simple perforation plates.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

All members of the Athelginae are abdominal parasites of paguroid crabs. Five species of athelgines from the Florida Museum of Natural History are reported here, three from new localities and hosts. Allathelges pakistanensis Kazmi & Markham, 1999 is recorded from Oman, from the type host. Athelges caudalis Barnard, 1955 is recorded from the Philippines from a new host, Calcinus latens (Randall, 1840). Parathelges sp., closely resembling the Atlantic species P. tumidipes Markham, 1972, is recorded from the Federated States of Micronesia from Clibanarius corallinus (H. Milne Edwards, 1848). New specimens of Pseudostegias dulcilacuum Markham, 1982 and Parathelges aniculi (Whitelegge, 1897) are recorded from Thailand and the Philippines from known hosts. Keys to species of Pseudostegias, Parathelges and Athelges are provided, and recorded hosts and localities of all species of Athelges and Parathelges are summarized.

In: Crustaceana

Summary

Ground parenchyma cells play a crucial role in the growth and the mechanical properties of bamboo plants. Investigation of the morphology of ground parenchyma cells is essential for understanding the physiological functions and mechanical properties of these cells. This study aimed to characterize the anatomical structure of bamboo ground parenchyma cells and provide a qualitative and quantitative basis for the more effective utilization of bamboo. To do this, the morphology of ground parenchyma cells in Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) was studied using light microscopy and field-emission environmental scanning electron microscopy. Results show that various geometric shapes of ground parenchyma cells were observed, including nearly circular, square, long, oval, and irregular shapes. Cell walls of both long and short parenchyma cells exhibited primary wall thickening and secondary wall thickening, resulting in a primary pit field and simple pits. Most long cells were strip-shaped (L/W = 2.52), while most short cells were short and wide (L/W = 0.59). The proportion of long cells was 11 times greater than that of short cells. Most long cells were filled with starch grains, and some short cells also occasionally had starch grains. These findings allowed the first construction of the three-dimensional structure of parenchyma cells.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Not only are vessel pits vital for the passage of sap into adjacent cells, but their anatomical morphology is also used as a tool to identify bamboo species. However, detailed studies comparing the pits’ structural parameters in culms of species with three rhizome types: sympodial bamboo, amphipodial bamboo, and monopodial bamboo, are lacking. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations were conducted to obtain the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of vessel pits in sympodial, amphipodial and monopodial bamboos, from twelve bamboo species in eight genera. Sympodial bamboos possess small and ovoid bordered pits, whereas amphipodial bamboos contain an abundance of slit-like pits, with the greatest pit membrane length occurring in the vessel wall. Both minute and large pit sizes can be found in monopodial bamboos. This study identified the first compound pits ever to be found in a bamboo species and these were found to occur more frequently in amphipodial and monopodial bamboos than in sympodial bamboos. Using the distribution frequency of the pit chamber’s horizontal diameter, we were able to determine pit size as being either small, medium or large. The striking differences in the vessel pits’ qualitative and quantitative characteristics could be the result of different climate and environmental factors.

In: IAWA Journal

Abstract

Two parasitic copepods, Lateracanthus quadripedis Kabata & Gusev, 1966 and Parabrachiella annulata (Markevich, 1940) (Lernaeopodidae), were found on a deep-sea rudis rattail, Coryphaenoides rudis Günther, 1878 (Macrouridae) collected from the Xingang fishing port in Chenggong Town, Taitung County, in south-eastern Taiwan. Lateracanthus quadripedis was found attached to the walls of the branchial cavity of the fish, whereas P. annulata was collected from the body surface. This paper also provides a full description of these two copepod species to elucidate possible geographical variations in their morphology. Remarkably, our specimens of both copepods are more similar to those from the Galápagos Islands than to those from the Aleutian-Deep or Japan.

In: Crustaceana

DNA barcoding seeks to assemble a standardized reference library for rapid and unambiguous identification of species, and can be used to screen for potentially cryptic species. The 5′ region of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI), which is a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene fragment, has been proposed as a universal marker for this purpose among animals. However, DNA barcoding of reptiles is still supported only by few datasets compared with other groups. We investigated the utilization of COI to discriminate 34 putative species of vipers, representing almost 92% of the recorded species in China. Based on a total of 241 sequences, our results indicated that the average degree of intraspecific variability (0.0198) tends to be one-sixth the average of interspecific divergence (0.0931), but no barcoding gap was detected between them. The threshold method, BLOG analyses and tree-based methods all can identify species with a high success rate. These results consistently suggested the usefulness and reliability of the DNA barcoding approach in Chinese vipers.

Full Access
In: Amphibia-Reptilia