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Author: Bunkyo Kin
Editor / Translator: Ross King
In Literary Sinitic and East Asia: A Cultural Sphere of Vernacular Reading, Professor Kin Bunkyō surveys the history of reading technologies referred to as kundoku 訓讀 in Japanese, hundok in Korean and xundu in Mandarin. Rendered by the translators as ‘vernacular reading’, these technologies were used to read Literary Sinitic through and into a wide variety of vernacular languages across diverse premodern East Asian civilizations and literary cultures. The book’s editor, Ross King, prefaces the translation with an essay comparing East Asian traditions of ‘vernacular reading’ with typologically similar reading technologies in the Ancient Near East and calls for a shift in research focus from writing to reading, and from ‘heterography’ to ‘heterolexia’.
Translators are Marjorie Burge, Mina Hattori, Ross King, Alexey Lushchenko, and Si Nae Park.
Korea's Indigenous Script
Author: Zong-Su Kim
Translator: Ross King
The author traces the history and evolution of Hangeul, considers its scientific principles, practicality and features, addresses the question of the so-called ‘culture block’ in the international arena, and anticipates the direction in which it could evolve and thereby attract wider usage and credibility. First proclaimed in 1446 as the ‘correct sounds for the instruction of the people’ ( Hunminjeongeum), the Korean indigenous script is considered to be one of the most practical and logical languages in the world, yet as a unique minority language it is regarded by many as being under threat from the Roman alphabet and dominant languages of the East Asian region.
Series Editors: Ross King, David Lurie, and Marion Eggert
Edited by Ross King, University of British Columbia, David Lurie, Columbia University and Marion Eggert, Ruhr-Universität Bochum
The series will be of interest to anybody interested in questions of cosmopolitan and vernacular in the Sinographic Cosmopolis—specifically, with respect to questions of language, writing and literary culture, embracing both beginnings (the origins of and early sources for writing in the sinographic sphere) and endings (the disintegration of the Sinographic Cosmopolis in places like Korea, Japan and Vietnam, and the advent of linguistic modernity throughout all of the old Sinitic sphere. In addition, the series will feature comparative research on interactions and synergies in language, writing and literary culture in the Sinographic Cosmopolis over nearly two millennia, as well as studies of the 'sinographic hangover' in modern East Asia-critical and comparative assessments of the social and cultural history of language and writing and linguistic thought in modern and premodern East Asia.
The Literary Sinitic Context and the Birth of Modern Japanese Language and Literature
Author: Mareshi Saito
Editors / Translators: Ross King and Christina Laffin
In Kanbunmyaku: The Literary Sinitic Context and the Birth of Modern Japanese Language and Literature, Saito Mareshi demonstrates the centrality of Literary Sinitic poetry and prose in the creation of modern literary Japanese. Saito’s new understanding of the role of “ kanbunmyaku” in the formation of Japanese literary modernity challenges dominant narratives tied to translations from modern Western literatures and problematizes the antagonism between Literary Sinitic and Japanese in the modern academy. Saito shows how kundoku (vernacular reading) and its rhythms were central to the rise of new inscriptional styles, charts the changing relationship of modern poets and novelists to kanbunmyaku, and concludes that the chronotope of modern Japan was based in a language world supported by the Literary Sinitic Context.
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
In: Literary Sinitic and East Asia
Building on Brill’s extensive experience and traditional strengths in the areas of Asian culture, history and society, the new Korean Studies Library invites submissions of book manuscripts on any time period of Korea, from ancient times to the present day, for consideration in this new series. Social science and humanities publications will be the focus, and the series editors particularly welcome submissions in the areas of premodern history, literature, religion, thought, society and language, and in modern history, literature, religion, political economy and society; the intent is to publish scholarship on Korea that will remain relevant for decades to come.