Search Results

Volume Editors: Ruth Frehner and Ursula Zeller
This is the first-time publication of long-lost letters by a crucial figure in modernist publishing. Carefully edited and extensively contextualised, they document Beach’s unwavering, all-embracing support for Joyce’s art by publishing his controversial Ulysses in Paris in 1922 and other efforts such as getting fragments of Work in Progress published. They also reveal her difficulties with his uncompromising and demanding personality, as it is vividly illustrated in the Frankfurter Zeitung affair. The edition moreover includes all extant letters to Paul Léon, her successor after their break-up following severe disagreements over the American edition of Ulysses. Joyceans and scholars of modernism will find this an indispensable resource for further research.

Abstract

Two scholars who were part of the team of revisers of Hans Wollschläger’s translation of Ulysses discuss a few clusters of challenges to overcome. After outlining the team’s translatorial priorities, the first part of this essay focuses on the worlds of thought of Bloom and Molly, by tackling the language of visual and sensory formulations that resists interlinguistic transfer. Examples of Joyce’s use of interior monologue, Hiberno-English, and other syntactical experiments serve to illustrate Wollschläger’s departures from the original that the revision sought to amend. The second part is devoted to the challenges of linguistic musicality in “Sirens.” It is particularly interesting to examine Wollschläger’s approach as a translator to the episode’s syntactic and lexical musicality, transposition, sound, rhythm, and register – given that Wollschläger was a musicologist and trained musician.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century

Abstract

Two scholars who were part of the team of revisers of Hans Wollschläger’s translation of Ulysses discuss a few clusters of challenges to overcome. After outlining the team’s translatorial priorities, the first part of this essay focuses on the worlds of thought of Bloom and Molly, by tackling the language of visual and sensory formulations that resists interlinguistic transfer. Examples of Joyce’s use of interior monologue, Hiberno-English, and other syntactical experiments serve to illustrate Wollschläger’s departures from the original that the revision sought to amend. The second part is devoted to the challenges of linguistic musicality in “Sirens.” It is particularly interesting to examine Wollschläger’s approach as a translator to the episode’s syntactic and lexical musicality, transposition, sound, rhythm, and register – given that Wollschläger was a musicologist and trained musician.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century