Abstract

James Joyce’s use of advertising in Ulysses can be studied by looking at some of its most prominent advertisements and at the way in which they are perceived by Bloom. In addition, reading their occurrence against the background of the notes that Joyce took on the issue of advertising adds another intriguing aspect. Starting from the premise that it is a characteristic of Joyce’s prose that almost any passage would do to illustrate a principle and that any component can lend itself to highlight typical features of the whole book, the question that will be addressed is to what extent this is true of Joyce’s use of advertising and what its consequences are for our understanding of the book as a whole.

In: Publishing in Joyce's Ulysses
Newspapers, Advertising and Printing
Appearing in an era of rapid change in the printing and publishing industries, James Joyce’s Ulysses exploited and exemplified those industries to the degree that the book can be seen as a virtual museum of 1904 media. Publishing in Joyce's “Ulysses”: Newspapers, Advertising and Printing, edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso, gathers twelve essays by Joyce scholars exploring facets of those trades that pervade the substance of the book. Essays explore the book’s incorporation of mass-market weekly magazines, contemporary advertising slogans, newspaper clippings, the “Aeolus” episode’s printing office and the varied typographic styles of successive editions of Ulysses. Placing Joyce’s work in its historical milieu, the collection offers a fresh perspective on modern print culture.

Contributors are: Sabrina Alonso, Harald Beck, William S. Brockman, Elisabetta d'Erme, Judith Harrington, Matthew Hayward, Sangam MacDuff, Tekla Mecsnóber, Tamara Radak, Fritz Senn, David Spurr, Jolanta Wawrzycka.
In: Publishing in Joyce's Ulysses