Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: Sam Muller x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Essays on ICTY Procedure and Evidence
In: Essays on ICTY Procedure and Evidence
In: International Organizations Law Review
New Hopes for International Arbitration
Editors: Sam Muller and Wim Mijs
Among the aims of the United Nations Decade of International Law is the promotion of the means and methods for the peaceful settlement of disputes between states. In the previous volume, The United Nations Decade of International Law, Reflections on International Dispute Settlement, the editors contributed to this aim by bringing together a variety of opinions by international legal experts on the topic, with an emphasis on the role of the International Court of Justice. This time, the editors turn their attention to international arbitration and the role of the Permanent Court of Arbitration. It also explores the prospects for pre-constituted, non-ad hoc arbitral institutions which may be considered in the general framework of peaceful settlement of disputes between states, as well as between states and other actors (commercial arbitration) in the present day international system, through the process of international adjudication. Like the previous volume, this book is a valuable contribution towards the promotion of the United Nations Decade of International Law.
In: Hague Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire de La Haye de Droit International, Vol. 16 (2003)
In: Hague Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire de La Haye de Droit International, Vol. 15 (2002)
This volume is a collection of essays dealing primarily with supervision by international organizations of, on the one hand, state behaviour and, on the other, the conduct of the organizations themselves. The first is termed external supervision, the second internal supervision. An extensive range of international organizations is covered, among them the ILO, the IMF, GATT and the United Nations.

Both national and international law are created and upheld in a global legal environment that seems to be changing dramatically. Many lawyers and legal scholars have extensively signaled and analysed the internationalisation of law and the rise of private legal and governance regimes. In this article, these trends are used to explore the future of the global legal environment. The use of scenario techniques enables us to systematically scrutinise possible futures. In turn, the scenarios indicate major strategic challenges for both national legislators and international legal institutions.

In: Tilburg Law Review
Reflections on International Dispute Settlement
In its forty-fourth session the General Assembly of the United Nations proclaimed the 1990s as the Decade of International Law. One of the main purposes of the decade is the promotion of effective means for peaceful international dispute settlement, and, especially, strenghtening the role of and respect for the International Court of Justice, the principal judicial organ of the United Nations.
The editors of this book contribute to this aim by bringing together a variety of opinions by international legal experts on peaceful dispute settlement. The subject is approached from different angles, ranging from the role of the International Law Commission and the Non-Aligned Movement to human rights and space law disputes, in order to identify areas of international law where room exists for further development of existing means for peaceful settlement of international disputes.
A general conclusion which can be drawn from this survey is that the focus of attention should not be aimed primarily at strenghtening the role of the International Court of Justice, e.g. by amending some of its rules or by trying to increase its political acceptability through diplomatic efforts. Instead, the focus should be on small scale improvements within specific areas of international law with an emphasis on the relation between dispute settlement and supervision. Furthermore, it seems essential for a real improvement to give non-governmental organisations or private persons a greater role in upholding the rule of international law, whether in domestic courts or in international fora.
This work has been published previously in the Leiden Journal of International Law, Special Issue (3 LJIL 90).
In: Reflections on Global Law