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Author: SAM SLOTE

Abstract

This essay proposes a distinction between epistemological error and ontological error in order to explore whether it is possible to talk about Finnegans Wake in terms of error at all. Epistemological error is described as deviation against some normative constitution of what is correct, whereas ontological error arises in situations where recourse to a normative (and thus regulatory) standard is ambiguous. After illustrating these concepts with examples from Ulysses, I amplify this definition by reading a passage from Kierkegaard's The Sickness unto Death and then apply it to chapter II.2 of Finnegans Wake.

In: Errears and Erroriboose
Author: SAM SLOTE

Abstract

This essay proposes a distinction between epistemological error and ontological error in order to explore whether it is possible to talk about Finnegans Wake in terms of error at all. Epistemological error is described as deviation against some normative constitution of what is correct, whereas ontological error arises in situations where recourse to a normative (and thus regulatory) standard is ambiguous. After illustrating these concepts with examples from Ulysses, I amplify this definition by reading a passage from Kierkegaard's The Sickness unto Death and then apply it to chapter II.2 of Finnegans Wake.

In: Errears and Erroriboose
In: Doubtful Points
In: Doubtful Points
Author: Sam Slote

Abstract

The first editor of Ulysses was James Joyce. As he was overseeing typescripts and proofs, Joyce had to correct errors and misprisions inflicted upon his text, some of which he had himself made. Of course, this editorial work was (mostly) subsumed within Joyce’s authorial role as he expanded and revised his text towards publication. Indeed, the character of the editorial emendations that Joyce made evolves over the course of Ulysses’s composition, thereby reflecting his own changing conceptions of his book.

In: James Joyce and Genetic Criticism
Author: Sam Slote

Abstract

This chapter takes as its premise that once a text is translated, it is exponentially retranslatable and partakes in “the problem of textual transmission in general.” Slote centres his discussion on the issues of translatorial multiplicity, departing from a critical rereading of Derrida’s “Ulysses Gramophone.” He examines textual elements of Ulysses – the dot and the end of “Ithaca” and the instances of Joyce’s non-existent yeses that nevertheless appear in the French Ulysse, to be theorized by Derrida; Slote concludes that translation fictionalises a text by misrepresenting and falsifying the original.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century
Author: Sam Slote

Abstract

The first editor of Ulysses was James Joyce. As he was overseeing typescripts and proofs, Joyce had to correct errors and misprisions inflicted upon his text, some of which he had himself made. Of course, this editorial work was (mostly) subsumed within Joyce’s authorial role as he expanded and revised his text towards publication. Indeed, the character of the editorial emendations that Joyce made evolves over the course of Ulysses’s composition, thereby reflecting his own changing conceptions of his book.

In: James Joyce and Genetic Criticism
In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age
In: A Long the Krommerun
In: Probes