Search Results

No Access

Oscar Wilde in Vienna

Pleasing and Teasing the Audience

Series:

Sandra Mayer

Oscar Wilde in Vienna is the first book-length study in English of the reception of Oscar Wilde’s works in the German-speaking world. Charting the plays’ history on Viennese stages between 1903 and 2013, it casts a spotlight on the international reputation of one of the most popular English-language writers while contributing to Austrian cultural history in the long twentieth century.

Drawing on extensive archival material, the book examines the appropriation of Wilde's plays against the background of political crises and social transformations. It unravels the mechanisms of cultural transfer and canonisation within an environment positioned — like Wilde himself — at the crossroads of centre and periphery, tradition and modernity.
No Access

Series:

Sandra Mayer

Abstract

Regardless of Roland Barthes’ forcefully proclaimed “death of the author,” authorial agency has remained a controversially discussed concept in contemporary critical debate, and the sphere of literary production continues to exploit the reputational capital and star potential of literary brand names. The proliferation and intense media coverage of literary prizes, in particular, attest to the firm ties between cultural and economic capital. By taking a close look at the lectures delivered by two successive Nobel Laureates, this chapter seeks to explore the ways in which the publicity generated by high-profile literary prizes provides authors with a powerful platform for self-fashioning. Both the Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek and the British dramatist Harold Pinter, respective winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2004 and 2005, have a career history as astute left-wing intellectuals, political activists, and cultural critics, sharing a larger-than-life public image that has been shaped by an intricate interplay of art and politics. A comparative analysis of their Nobel lectures aims at highlighting the multi-medial forms and strategies of authorial self-representation and thus ultimately touches upon some of the core debates of celebrity studies, such as the dichotomy of public vs. private self, negotiations of absence and presence, and the political power of celebrity.