In: Corinth in Contrast

Abstract

The latency of food retrieval and other behaviours in the presence of a live boa constrictor and other snake-like stimuli was observed in three groups of squirrel monkeys (adult feral, adult laboratory reared, and immature laboratory reared). The principal results were as follows: 1. Both of the laboratory reared groups retrieved food within about five or fewer sec in the presence of any stimulus, including the live snake. 2. The retrieval latencies of the adult feral group were longest in the presence of the live snake, the next longest in the presence of rubber snakes painted either gray or an approximation of the boa constrictor markings, and shortest in the presence of various rubber tubes or a gray block. This result suggests that avoidance of some snake like stimuli in the adult feral squirrel monkey is determined more by shape than by markings. 3. The habituation of the snake avoidance response was rapid for all stimuli, but occurred more slowly for the live snake than for the two rubber snakes. 4. Of the various behaviors observed in the interval between the presentation and the retrieval of food, visual scanning was predominant and occurred during 74 percent of this time.

In: Behaviour

In this article we examine the introduction of digital video pedagogy into dynamic workplaces with fast-changing social and material environments, and discuss its potential to participate in producing forms of positive change. The discussion brings together two strands: we investigate workplace learning theoretically as it emerges as part of a digital material world; and we consider how we might re-think workplace learning through possibilities of digital technologies. We develop this discussion through the example of how digital video has been used to engender new ways of learning and knowing about safety in one of the most dangerous workplaces globally - the construction industry.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Studies in Inequality
n Corinth in Contrast, archaeologists, historians, art historians, classicists, and New Testament scholars examine the stratified nature of socio-economic, political, and religious interactions in the city from the Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity. The volume challenges standard social histories of Corinth by focusing on the unequal distribution of material, cultural, and spiritual resources. Specialists investigate specific aspects of cultural and material stratification such as commerce, slavery, religion, marriage and family, gender, and art, analyzing both the ruling elite of Corinth and the non-elite Corinthians who made up the majority of the population. This approach provides insight into the complex networks that characterized every ancient urban center and sets an agenda for future studies of Corinth and other cities rule by Rome.
Studies in Inequality
In Corinth in Contrast, archaeologists, historians, art historians, classicists, and New Testament scholars examine the stratified nature of socio-economic, political, and religious interactions in the city from the Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity. The volume challenges standard social histories of Corinth by focusing on the unequal distribution of material, cultural, and spiritual resources. Specialists investigate specific aspects of cultural and material stratification such as commerce, slavery, religion, marriage and family, gender, and art, analyzing both the ruling elite of Corinth and the non-elite Corinthians who made up the majority of the population. This approach provides insight into the complex networks that characterized every ancient urban center and sets an agenda for future studies of Corinth and other cities rule by Rome.
In: Corinth in Contrast
In: Corinth in Contrast
In: Corinth in Contrast
In: Corinth in Contrast
In: Corinth in Contrast