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Abstract

Using novel quantitative data from the Millennial Trends Survey administered online in March 2019 with over 2,500 respondents between the ages of 18 and 35 in both Canada and the U.S., we examine in detail inherited (non)religion as well as intergenerational conversion and disaffiliation among young adult birth cohorts. Key results include approximately two thirds of Millennials in our sample belonging to the same (non)religious tradition of at least one of their parents. Among the remaining one third who did have a different religious (non)affiliation than their parents at the time of the survey, intergenerational disaffiliation was the most common change present: especially in Canada, but also in the U.S. Intergenerational retention of nonreligion among families where both parents are nonreligious are especially high among Millennials in both countries, a characteristic of this generation’s much more secular social milieu.

In: Journal of Religion and Demography
In: Secular Studies

Abstract

Almost all the existing research in the subfield of nonreligion and secularity studies has focused to date on majority populations (Whites from Christian family backgrounds) in North America and Europe. Using data from the 2011 National Household Survey and the 2013–2017 General Social Surveys, this research note is a first step towards better understanding the ethno-racial and immigrant diversity within the nonreligious population of one nation, Canada. A further emphasis is placed on socio-demographic trends among these different nonreligious groups, as well as their various experiences when it comes to the presence or absence of spiritual beliefs and practices in their lives away from organized religion.

In: Secular Studies
In: Secular Studies

Abstract

This article compares youth religiosity in each Catholic European country (CEC) in two perspectives: with the rest of the population (35+) and among youth over time. Based on EVS (European Values Study) and ISSP (International Social Survey Programme), data comparisons are also made between CEC s, as well as between and within European regions. Three dimensions of religiosity are examined: community, belief, and practice. Results confirm that in general youth religiosity is lower than among the older age group and decreases over time with some exceptions. Results also confirm the theories of cohort replacement and of multiple secularizations.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe