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Ecologies and Economies in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Studies in Environmental History for Richard C. Hoffmann

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Edited by Scott Bruce

The field of premodern environmental history (the study of the complex and ever-changing interrelationship between human beings and the world around them prior to the Industrial Revolution) has grown vigorously over the past two decades, in no small part due to the energy and expertise of Richard C. Hoffmann (York University, Canada). In this collection, historians of medieval and early modern Europe and social scientists with a sensitivity to the use of historical information present their current research in honor of Richard C. Hoffmann's retirement from teaching. The result is a panoramic and dynamic view of the state of the field of premodern environmental history by leading practitioners. The papers are organized under the broad themes of "Premodern People and the Natural World" and "Aquatic Ecosystems and Human Economies".

Contributors are Richard W. Unger, Paolo Squatriti, William Chester Jordan, Petra J.E.M. van Dam, Verena Winiwarter, Maryanne Kowaleski, Constance H. Berman, Pierre Claude Reynard, Wim Van Neer, and Anton Ervynck.
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Bruce D. Chilton, Porton and Louis Feldman

Edited by James Scott

The exiles of Israel and Judah cast a long shadow over the biblical text and the whole subsequent history of Judaism. Scholars have long recognized the importance of the theme of exile for the Hebrew Bible. Indeed, critical study of the Old Testament has, at least since Wellhausen, been dominated by the Babylonian exile of Judah. In 586 BC, several factors, including the destruction of Jerusalem, the cessation of the sacrificial cult and of the monarchy, and the experience of the exile, began to cause a transformation of Israelite religion which supplied the contours of the larger Judaic framework within which the various forms of Judaism, including the early Christian movement, developed.
Given the importance of the exile to the development of Judaism and Christianity even to the present day, this volume delves into the conceptions of exile which contributed to that development during the formative period.
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William Scott Green, Alan J. Avery-Peck, Bruce Chilton and Gary G. Porton

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Edited by Alan J. Avery-Peck, Bruce Chilton, William Scott Green and Gary G. Porton

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Edited by Alan J. Avery-Peck, Bruce Chilton, William Scott Green and Gary G. Porton

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Edited by Alan J. Avery-Peck, Bruce Chilton, William Scott Green and Gary G. Porton

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Edited by Alan J. Avery-Peck, Bruce Chilton, William Scott Green and Gary G. Porton

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A Legacy of Learning

Essays in Honor of Jacob Neusner

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Edited by Alan Avery-Peck, Bruce D. Chilton, William Scott Green and Gary Porton

In a career spanning over fifty years, the questions Jacob Neusner has asked and the critical methodologies he has developed have shaped the way scholars have come to approach the rabbinic literature as well as the diverse manifestations of Judaism from rabbinic times until the present. The essays collected here honor that legacy, illustrating an influence that is so pervasive that scholars today who engage in the critical study of Judaism and the history of religions more generally work in a laboratory that Professor Neusner created. Addressing topics in ancient and Rabbinic Judaism, the Judaic context of early Christianity, American Judaism, World Religions, and the academic study of the humanities, these essays demarcate the current state of Judaic and religious studies in the academy today.