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Indigenous studies and Taiwan studies have a rather tenuous intellectual relationship. From a Taiwanese perspective, the study of indigenous peoples has been a part of the inward-turning indigenisation (本土化, bentuhua) of Taiwan scholarship; affirmation of a locally-rooted, non-Chinese national identity. The idea that Taiwan is the starting point of the Austronesian diaspora makes Taiwan important to the world in new ways. For indigenous scholars, indigenous studies can also contribute to a pride of their places and cultures, meaningful on their own terms. Applied and action research can also be helpful to indigenous goals of local self-determination. Reflection on the ontological implications of indigeneity suggests that indigenous studies cannot be relegated to a subfield of Taiwan studies. There is thus a need for reflection on the ontology of our studies.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies
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Abstract

Indigeneity, enshrined in the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, is an international governance model that promises sovereignty and self-government to indigenous nations. Anthropologists have expressed concern that indigeneity may become an avatar of neoliberal governance that benefits a small elite and contributes to the hypermarginalisation of the poor. This multi-scalar ethnography explores the meaning of indigeneity in Seediq and Truku communities. The author concurs that legal indigeneity fails to meet the needs of the poor. Most ordinary indigenous people perceive that they already benefit from Taiwan’s existing legal framework and fail to understand the need for new institutions. For the case of Taiwan, moreover, the limits of indigeneity are most evident in the exclusion of Taiwanese indigenous peoples—and Taiwan—from United Nations mechanisms. As indigeneity degenerates into great power politics, it falls short of its aspirations to recognise indigenous nations as ontological equals to established states.

In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies
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Abstract

Although Plato uses the same concept of erotic love in both the Symposium and the Phaedrus, his treatment of it differs strikingly in these dialogues. One of the main reasons for this is that whereas, in the Symposium, rational and non-rational erotic desires are considered to be incompatible, in the Phaedrus he attempts to integrate them in the belief that this will allow us to love and live well. This integration is articulated by means of a complex model of the psyche. Plato sets up the dialogue’s three main speeches in such a way as to critique reductive, bipartite models of the psyche that fail to take into account the θυμός from which most emotions originate. He demonstrates that θυμός, and in particular the emotion shame, have important roles in the integration of erotic desires. This chapter will carry out a close reading of the Phaedrus to study how Plato effects this. Divided into three parts, it will: (1) establish the importance of θυμός; (2) carry out a close reading of the dialogue’s third speech in which Socrates integrates rational and non-rational erotic desires; and (3) consider the importance of shame in the dialogue’s lengthy discussion of rhetoric and the way it manipulates emotions.

In: Emotions in Plato
In: International Perspective on Indigenous Religious Rights

The performance measures important to New Zealand beef producers and processors in their selling and buying decisions were studied using a conjoint analysis methodology. 98 producers and 5 processors were asked to rank and rate various scenarios. Producers preferred scenarios in which they received a high price, had high payment security, a premium for quality, had a short lead-time and the processor shared some information. Processors focussed on factors that enabled them to reduce their risk and cost of supply, and ensure traceability back to farms.

In: Dynamics in chains and networks