In: At the Intersection of Selves and Subject
In: Ways of Being in Teaching
In: The Negotiated Self
In: Being with A/r/tography
Conversations and Reflections
Volume Editor: Sean Wiebe
As teachers, we share experiences with one another. It is a way to make sense of our teaching lives and teaching selves. Ways of Being in Teaching is that kind of sharing; it is a scholarly conversation that will appeal to teachers who are tired of the tips and tricks, and want to talk more deeply about how to flourish in this profession.

Most of us know ways to strengthen and sustain self, soul, heart, identity, and how these key touchstones also strengthen teaching. This book recognizes that who we are, where we are, and why, is as much a social process as a personal one. Attending to life purpose is a way of attending to teaching. Chapters in this text are insightfully forthright, challenging us to undertake the rigourous work of discovering who we are as human beings and how this impacts who we are with our students. Canadian curriculum scholar Cynthia Chambers asks us to listen for what keeps us awake at night, and with Ways of Being in Teaching we bring what we have heard into the daylight, into the conversation.

“This collection of reflections and conversations does more than provide provocative reading for the reflective teacher. It invites practitioners to find their own place at the table of sharing and to welcome the stories that will certainly come as a result of engaging with this community of life writers.” – Carmen Schlamb, Professor, Seneca College
In: Ways of Being in Teaching
In: At the Intersection of Selves and Subject
In: Poetic Inquiry II – Seeing, Caring, Understanding
In: Poetic Inquiry II – Seeing, Caring, Understanding
Authors: Sean Wiebe and Ellyn Lyle

Abstract

definition of learning is remarkably similar to his description of an aesthetic experience: learning is “finding out what nobody has previously known” (p. 152). If learning is finding out what is not known, then there is no teacher knowledge that should precede the pedagogical moment of the classroom. On balance, it would be better for the teacher to not know rather than to know. As curriculum scholars who work in teacher education, we argue that it is through a better understanding of the aesthetic encounter that teachers might come to a fuller and deeper understanding of learning and how to enter the classroom without a preconception of the ways learning might unfold. What intrigues us in Dewey’s description of an aesthetic encounter is a methodological process that challenges learners to understand their lived experience through the compression of past, present, and future. Engaging in our own art-making processes of poetry and photography (the compression), we look back at our respective teaching pasts in order to stretch our minds towards future possibilities for teacher education that understand teaching and learning as an aesthetic encounter.

In: Imagining Dewey