In: Inclusion, Diversity, and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People's Philosophical Inquiry
Authors: Sequeira, Ferrand, and Crespo

Abstract

The reproductive cycle of the golden-striped salamander, Chioglossa lusitanica, was studied in the vicinity of Porto (northwestern Portugal), in a population that breeds in a mine gallery. Salamanders (67 females and 64 males) were collected between January and November of 1998. Both sexes showed a seasonal reproductive cycle. Spermatogenesis and oogenesis took place between winter and late spring and the presence of spermatozoa and mature oocytes were observed mainly between early summer and late autumn. Gonad, liver and tail weights varied seasonally in both sexes and appear related to different phases of the sexual cycle. Average potential clutch size was 17.8 (sx = 0.8; range = 9-34). Clutch size was correlated with snout-vent length and apparently not influenced by tail-length or age.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia
The ever-shifting cultural and linguistic landscapes in contemporary societies create new urgency for an intersectional thematic study of diversity, philosophy, and education. As educators, how do we transform the vision of cultural and linguistic diversity into a wealth of resources for learning? How do we actively engage cultural and linguistic diversities in philosophical inquiry with young people? How do we translate the philosophical notion of cultural and linguistic diversity into pedagogical practices?
The chapters in this book respond to the task of teaching philosophy in the context of increased mobility in the new global reality. By complicating the situated and fluid nature of contemporary classrooms, this book challenges the normalizing tendency often associated with philosophy education. Each chapter offers a unique perspective in understanding the profound embeddedness of philosophy education in broader sociocultural contexts and prioritizes diversity in the classroom community of inquiry. By carefully incorporating a broad range of theoretical perspectives and empirical research, this book provides a rich resource for school teachers and educators who wish to engage diverse learners in philosophical inquiry. In doing so, it reaffirms the value of philosophy education as a proactive approach to democratic education.
In: Inclusion, Diversity, and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People's Philosophical Inquiry
In: Inclusion, Diversity, and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People's Philosophical Inquiry

Abstract

The potential of the seventh intron of the β-subunit of the fibrinogen gene (β-fibint 7) for phylogenetic analysis within the Salamandridae family was explored, comparing the topologies of trees based on this marker to those based on mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene previously published. Using primers designed specifically for amphibians, we amplified 25 sequences of β-fibint 7 corresponding to 15 species of salamandrids and one plethodontid species. There was considerable length variation among the β-fibint 7 sequences examined, ranging from 1123 bp in S. atra to 400 bp in P. waltl. Many aspects of the phylogenetic relationships estimated by the two independent loci were congruent and corroborate current taxonomic hypothesis. Although the number of taxa analysed is small, the data obtained in this work suggested that β-fibint 7 is a useful marker for assessing phylogenetic relationships within the Salamandridae family, and is probably appropriate for phylogenetic studies among closely related salamanders that have diverged over the last 20 Myr.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia

Abstract

Miniaturisation is an important evolutionary trend for amphibians and has occurred several times in independent anuran lineages. Most miniaturised frogs live in the leaf litter of tropical forests and have terrestrial reproductive modes. They are expected to have reduced fecundity in number of eggs than larger-bodied related species, but little is known about reproductive cycles and proportion of reproductive females. Lower vagility is also assumed, however, as they are difficult to observe, there is little empirical evidence about their dispersal. We studied the reproductive biology (sex ratio, sexual size dimorphism and fecundity parameters) and population ecology (growth, dispersal, and phenology) of the miniature Guanabara Frog Euparkerella aff. brasiliensis (⩽ 20 mm). We collected and analysed 75 specimens of E. aff. brasiliensis, of which 27 were adult females with vitellogenic oocytes in their ovaries. Fecundity was low for number of eggs (average number = 9.7), but only one adult female had no vitellogenic oocytes. Sex ratio was relatively balanced among sexes, being female-biased (0.92) for all individuals and male-biased (1.17) for adults. Juveniles and ovigerous females were observed throughout the year during the two years of mark-recapture study, which indicates continuous breeding. We captured 121 individuals, of which 12% were recaptured in their original collection sites, suggesting low vagility. We discuss our findings considering the current knowledge about the ecology of miniaturised frogs and other Terraranae and suggest future directions for ecological studies and conservation planning.

In: Amphibia-Reptilia