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Editor: Serena Forlati
The twentieth anniversary of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (Palermo, 2000) is a timely moment for an appraisal of the Convention system, its developments (including the recently adopted review mechanism) and the challenges it faces. In The Palermo Convention at Twenty: Institutional and Substantive Challenges experts with different backgrounds begin such a discussion by focusing on the institutional and substantive features of the Convention and its potential as a tool for countering different forms of criminality – including some that were not meant, in principle, to fall under its scope.
In: Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime
Editor: Serena Forlati
This issue of Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime focuses on the implementation of the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its Supplementing Protocols. It is part of a broader project, marking the UNTOC’s 20th anniversary, which started with The Palermo Convention at Twenty–Institutional and Substantive Challenges (Brill, 2021) and aims at appraising the Convention’s legal framework and its suitability as a tool for effectively combating present-day transnational organized crime.
In: The Palermo Convention at Twenty
Author: Serena Forlati

Abstract

Serena Forlati discusses the relationship between the law of treaties and the law of international responsibility: in light of the icj’s key findings in Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros – specifically as regards the mutual autonomy and functional interaction between the two regimes. The author considers their impact of these findings on later case law and practice in different areas of international law,

In: The Gabčíkovo-Nagymaros Judgment and Its Contribution to the Development of International Law
Author: Serena Forlati

Abstract

This chapter reflects on the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECtHR) Grand Chamber judgment in Naït-Liman v Switzerland. Holding that Switzerland did not infringe Mr Naït-Liman’s right of access to a court under Article 6 of the Convention, the ECtHR cautiously avoided any form of ‘judicial law-making’, in keeping with a ‘conservative’ reading of the role of international courts and tribunals in contemporary international law. This notwithstanding, the Grand Chamber arguably gave much better consideration than the Chamber to the Court’s role in the development of international law, stating in rather clear terms that the exercise of universal civil jurisdiction is lawful – and, indeed, desirable – from the perspective of the European Convention of Human Rights.

In: Universal Civil Jurisdiction